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Try your hand at these 14wk old silkies

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Chris383, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. Chris383

    Chris383 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thoughts on sex?
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. CherriesBrood

    CherriesBrood Chicken Photographer Premium Member

    They both look like cocks to me because of their tops, but its really hard to tell genders on silkies.
     
  3. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    I pay more attention to combs than crests. Sometimes skimpy crests etc, are the result of hatchery breeding. Four to five months is better for serious gender attempts, tho sometimes you won't know for sure until they crow or lay eggs.

    Would like to see the combs on them next time you post photos.
     
  4. ChickNanny13

    ChickNanny13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pics of the combs please
     
  5. CherriesBrood

    CherriesBrood Chicken Photographer Premium Member

    Hers a direct quote from the silkie sexing thread

    [/quote]Look at the feathers on the chick's head. Males tend to have feathers that stand upright and curve towards the back, while the female head feathers tend to form in a rounded feather puff.

    Look at the comb when it develops within two to three weeks of the chick's birth. a male will have a larger comb than a female.

    Males are significantly larger than females, and this can be obvious a few days after hatching. This isn't considered a certain method of sexing though because you may just have a large female or a small male. It's also a poor method if you are trying to compare chicks from two different genetic lines.

    Listen for crowing. The chicks will start losing the fluffly baby feathers around four of five months. At that time a male silkie will start attempting to crow.

    Look at the saddle feathers just before the tail and the hackle feathers on the neck. These feathers will be long and sharp on a male and gently rounded on a female.[qoute]

    Now that I look at the pics. again, the white one looks to be a cock, and the brown one looks to be a female. Hope this helps. :)
     
  6. ChickNanny13

    ChickNanny13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Look at the feathers on the chick's head. Males tend to have feathers that stand upright and curve towards the back, while the female head feathers tend to form in a rounded feather puff.

    Look at the comb when it develops within two to three weeks of the chick's birth. a male will have a larger comb than a female.

    Males are significantly larger than females, and this can be obvious a few days after hatching. This isn't considered a certain method of sexing though because you may just have a large female or a small male. It's also a poor method if you are trying to compare chicks from two different genetic lines.

    Listen for crowing. The chicks will start losing the fluffly baby feathers around four of five months. At that time a male silkie will start attempting to crow.

    Look at the saddle feathers just before the tail and the hackle feathers on the neck. These feathers will be long and sharp on a male and gently rounded on a female.[qoute]

    Now that I look at the pics. again, the white one looks to be a cock, and the brown one looks to be a female. Hope this helps. [​IMG][/QUOTE]

    Agree - Let us know when you hear the crow or get an egg :)
     
  7. Chris383

    Chris383 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks I'll get some comb pictures but as of right now nether have much of anything developed.
     
  8. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm thinking cockerels, but Silkies are notoriously difficult to sex.
     

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