Tumor on Bottom?? No Feathers...5 week old *PICS included!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by SommerYards, May 24, 2011.

  1. SommerYards

    SommerYards New Egg

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    Apr 15, 2011
    We have one chick who is about 5 weeks old that looks way different then the others. She has a huge what seems to be growth on her bottom/underneath side that you can see in the pictures. She also has huge spots of no feathers. Her belly is completely bare with no feathers at all. Her tail feathers are just stubs. Compared to our other chicks who have lots of feathers and very fluffy tails and lots of feathers underneath I think she has some kind of sickness. I don't know if the bottom thing is related to the feathers but I am afraid if she has some sort of sickness that the rest of oru chicks will also get sick. We are new to raising chickens so any info would be great. Maybe this is all normal?? Oh and she also is panting a lot with her mouth open and lays most of the time unless something scares her. She just seems not to be 100% normal...

    This picture you can see the rawness on the behind area where the growth is and the stumpy tail feathers.
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    You can see in this picture that she has no feathers on the front of her wings...the light colored sections on her.
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    Thanks for all the help!
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2011
  2. JulieNKC

    JulieNKC Overrun With Chickens

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    I think he might be a cornish x. They are meat birds, and mine are fully feathered out but still have bare butts. They grow faster than their feathers can cover. I would do some research on cornish x if I were you, I'm thinking that's what that boy is. [​IMG]
     
  3. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, it's a Cornish X meat bird. A genetic monstrosity developed for extreme muscle mass gain as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, the vast majority of them die somewhere between 4 and 12 weeks due to systemic organ failure, especially congestive heart failure. They are also prone to heat stress/heat stroke and orthopedic problems including even bones that snap under their own weight.

    It's pretty unlikely that you can save the bird for a pet even if you want to. Give it a good life, and when the time comes, either harvest it for meat, or allow it to die a natural death or facilitate its death in as painless a manner as possible.
     

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