TUNNEL/CHUNNEL

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by mpoland33, Mar 16, 2016.

  1. mpoland33

    mpoland33 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 16, 2016
    I'm contemplating make a chunnel from my coops run over to the garden. It would be much like I'm sure you've seen on the mother earth site and here where it would be portable or with gates/doors that I could move around the vegetable garden.

    Anyway,
    My question is about the height of the half circle fencing for the chunnel. What would you recommend at the center of the circle?

    Also, i see many people recommend 14 gauge....if this is only for a couple hours a day, would I get away with something cheaper for it?
     
  2. chicklover 1998

    chicklover 1998 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would do about 2.5 foot unless you have game birds and then I would do 3.5 because they can be tall.
     
  3. mpoland33

    mpoland33 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks. I'm actually in the planning stage of everything...trying to get a budget set up to justify getting chickens with the wife..haha

    but I'm thinking I'll have either white leghorns or RIR's.

    Thanks for your help!
     
  4. chicklover 1998

    chicklover 1998 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    White eggs and lots of them(1 a day for the most part) with the leghorn, but can be unfriendly with people not mean just won't come up and say hi. Brown eggs a pretty good layer(5-6 a week) but are friendly. Is it more so the eggs you want or are you going to get some pretty breeds too? the pretty breeds may help your wife like the idea of chickens.
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I made a short one, used as an entrance to my grow-put coop, 12” high and it is not tall enough. Most hens are OK but the rooster can’t even come close standing up. 24” would be my minimum for the breeds you mentioned.

    I’m not familiar with the one that you are talking about. Can you give a link? How it is made and staked down is very important as to how safe it really is. 14 gauge is better than 19 gauge, but gauge may not be the most important part.
     
  6. mpoland33

    mpoland33 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the responses. Primary purpose would be eggs. My wife and kids go through a couple dozen a week so I'd like to help out with that..haha...

    But I'm also excited to put them to work (so to speak) with my vegetable gardens. I figure it'll cut down on the feed I have to buy but I have a pretty big Raspberry, strawberry, and vegetable patch that fertilizing and weeding would be a huge help

    I think my wife will probably wants eggs for cheap (ish) then I can get her into liking them for their looks..haha

    For the tunnel I was talking about, it would be similar to the one i found on this site by Kettle Ridge ( https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/969323/more-chunneling-fodder )

    But I was hoping to get away with a cheaper idea than the 14 gauge welded wire. Obviously I was them to be safe but my point of these are more of corralling them while I'm around rather than letting them out in this one their own all day. Just don't want them eating/tearing up places I don't want them eating/tearing up...haha
     
  7. ksguy

    ksguy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you don't already have some sort of structure for a coop, beware that your eggs are going to be quite expensive. I started with an existing garden shed that I converted into the coop and still wound up spending over $500 between "upgrades" to make the shed chicken-worthy, hardware cloth, welded wire fence, chicken wire (as a divider inside the coop), assorted posts and beams for the run, and fastening hardware. That would buy a lot of eggs. The chickens themselves were the least expensive part of the whole setup. I'm not trying to discourage you, just know that it's a valid argument your SWMBO could make. Granted I built a 16x16 run, big enough for way more than the 7 chickens I have. You might not need that much space.

    The best way to convince my wife was actually having her hold the baby chicks and letting her fall in love with their fuzziness and "cheep cheep" sounds. She really came around after watching them play around in the brooder (before I'd actually spent any money on the coop/run) and especially watching them face-plant for a nap when they got sleepy.

    All of that said, if I were doing this for my veggie garden I'd be comfortable with 2.5' wide at the base, and 2' tall in the center. That's big enough for birds to pass each other as well as stand up straight. I have Buff Orpingtons and Easter Eggers. For covering material, I'd personally either use deer netting or chicken wire as it is not a permanent home, just a barrier to keep them from digging up and eating my food. And since mine generally free range during the day, I can't really claim predator-worthiness as a consideration since for the rest of the time they aren't protected at all.

    If you won't be watching over them, or they spend the rest of their time in a protected coop, you might consider something more sturdy in case a fox or neighbor dog wanders in, as neither of the above would stop a determined predator.
     
  8. mpoland33

    mpoland33 Out Of The Brooder

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    Great, thanks!

    Yeah, she knows we won't end up ahead on this venture...but she wants fresh eggs for the kids so that's a plus. I have a lot of leftover wood from other projects that I plan to make a lean-to roof style coop with. I think, for me, the chicken wire for the run I want to build will be the post expensive part for us...at least I hope...haha
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    In my opinion gauge is not very important in that design. You are basically just containing the chickens, not providing predator protection. Just use something stiff enough to maintain its shape.
     
  10. mpoland33

    mpoland33 Out Of The Brooder

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    great, thanks. That's what I was thinking too
     

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