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Turkey coops in Washington

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by kattwoman, Sep 14, 2009.

  1. kattwoman

    kattwoman Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 26, 2009
    Last night I read many posts about turkey coops, but none were specifically for the Pacific Northwest. Last spring we just built our chicken coop, and that sucker cost $1,000. As much as I want to raise turkeys, there's no way I'm going to spend another thousand bucks.

    So, are there any special considerations for turkeys in our wet climate? From what I'm gathering, they are much hardier than chickens. Can I build a decent 3 sided shelter so they can escape from the rain, and just build a huge pen for them to roam around in? Do they have to be kept off the dirt like chickens? (of course I'd put plenty of hay on the ground for them.)

    I'm sure this topic has been discussed to death, but any help would be deeply appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. Harp Turkey Ranch

    Harp Turkey Ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 18, 2008
    McCleary, WA
    Yes coops here in the PNW is a little tricky.

    First you want to make sure they have wooden or concrete floors or else they will turn in to a mud pit in the winter. 3 sided shed will be just fine with the opening facing away from the weather side. I find that the shavings are better for me then straw or hay as when the straw and hay get wet they are real heavy and a pain to clean out. Bedding gets changes about every week or more in the winter when we get all our rains. Nest boxes get changes almost daily in the winter. when it gets real bad I lock them in their house so they don't get out in the mud and track it all back in the house, makes a huge mess fast. I only have mine locked up late winter/spring for breeding and that seems to be the worst time and it just takes extra time and patience. In the runs have had pretty good luck with hog fuel about 6" or so deep and keep them off during the BAD weather and stays good for a few years I have seen runs around here in Gravel,sand and pea gravel all seemed to work good.
     
  3. kattwoman

    kattwoman Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 26, 2009
    Well, I was hoping to avoid the cost of the floor, but if I have to then I have to. Clean up doesn't sound too different from chickens so far. I have a tendency to go overboard on projects so I'm trying to keep it to bare basics.

    Can they roam in their pen in the rain? I didn't put a roof over the chicken run, and I wish I had. I was thinking if I had a large enough 3 sided shelter, the turkeys would be able to come in and out when they needed. Or do I need to "baby" them more? Thanks for letting me pick your brain!

    ETA: I was thinking for the fourth side I'd put a chicken wire screen with a big door, so if I had to, I could shut them up in it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2009
  4. Harp Turkey Ranch

    Harp Turkey Ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

    831
    1
    141
    Dec 18, 2008
    McCleary, WA
    No roof will be needed for the run just a screen top so they can not fly out

    The floor would need to be just in the house, it can be as cheap as OSB on 2x4's (cheapest) only needs to support the turkeys not a huge load.

    They can roam in their pen in the rain as long as it is not muddy, when it gets muddy and they are in it it stinks and they track mud all back in the house and nest boxes.

    The fourth side sounds just fine, I would put the door on so you can have the option to lock them up when cleaning the runs or just plain bad weather or what ever reason you could have.
     
  5. kattwoman

    kattwoman Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 26, 2009
    Great! Thanks for your help. I'll pass on all info to my dh.
     

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