Turkey genders

Wolfefarmyard

Crowing
Aug 18, 2017
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Gansevoort, NY
Hi, I have 2 turkeys whom are the same age, one of the Spanish black variety, and the other is a bourbon red.

I’m guessing it’s still too young to determine their genders but I’m not sure so I figured I mine as well ask! I’m still only in my first year of turkeys.

I have noticed that the black one is loosing it’s head fluff before the red one if that means anything.

Thanks!!
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R2elk

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Alright I’ll update in a few weeks!

What exactly would be the first hints one may be a Tom?

Thanks!
Caruncle growth and redness in head and neck area without a reason for it. A tom will grow a bigger wattle quicker than a hen will. Depending on the variety, snood growth may be an indicator. Some varieties have very early snood growth while other varieties have very slow snood growth.

For same varieties, faster growth in toms. They get bigger with heavier legs quicker than the hens. This may not hold true when trying to compare sexes in turkeys that are not the same variety. For example, a juvenile Bourbon Red hen and a juvenile Royal Palm tom that are the same age may have the Bourbon Red hen equal to or larger than the Royal Palm tom.

Later developments are baldness in males and mohawk in females. Once the adult breast feathers are in, turkeys with dark colors can be sexed by the breast feathers. Male breast feathers will have dark colored lower edges and females will have light colored lower edges.

If there are no late developing toms, 3 months old is about the earliest they can be sexed from photos. Late developing toms can take 6 months or longer to be identified.
 
Last edited:

Farmerwife1

Chirping
Jun 1, 2018
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76
Hi, I have 2 turkeys whom are the same age, one of the Spanish black variety, and the other is a bourbon red.

I’m guessing it’s still too young to determine their genders but I’m not sure so I figured I mine as well ask! I’m still only in my first year of turkeys.

I have noticed that the black one is loosing it’s head fluff before the red one if that means anything.

Thanks!! View attachment 1885972
This summer I started with 11 turkeys. I have 9 now. My chickens killed one and my dog killed another. They are 2 months old now and it’s pretty clear what they are. The males are very colorful on their heads and their snoods are are now starting to hang over the side of their beak, while the females are still very small be comparison. I have 5 males and 4 females.
 

Wolfefarmyard

Crowing
Aug 18, 2017
1,724
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Gansevoort, NY
I’ve noticed that the black one has lost a lot of the feathers on its head, and is getting a little color to its face.

I’ve heard Mohawk may mean a female, so I was thinking it may be a girl but now I’m noticing some red, so maybe a male?

4830A4BD-A639-4767-BF80-9FD3174495C7.jpeg
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00E635F5-C487-4B52-A66A-0E87469FDB99.jpeg
 

R2elk

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Premium Feather Member
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I’ve noticed that the black one has lost a lot of the feathers on its head, and is getting a little color to its face.

I’ve heard Mohawk may mean a female, so I was thinking it may be a girl but now I’m noticing some red, so maybe a male?

View attachment 1893431 View attachment 1893432 View attachment 1893433 View attachment 1893434
Still looks like a hen. There does not appear to be any substantial wattle or snood growth. The legs do not look as heavy as would be expected from a tom. A little redness does not indicate a tom. With a young tom, the whole head would turn very red. Hens can also change the colors of their heads.

The white spots developing would seem to indicate a Mottled Black.
 

Wolfefarmyard

Crowing
Aug 18, 2017
1,724
3,187
342
Gansevoort, NY
Still looks like a hen. There does not appear to be any substantial wattle or snood growth. The legs do not look as heavy as would be expected from a tom. A little redness does not indicate a tom. With a young tom, the whole head would turn very red. Hens can also change the colors of their heads.

The white spots developing would seem to indicate a Mottled Black.

Okay, thank you.

The other red bourbon one still looks the same and still has feathers on it’s head.
 

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