Turkey had weird sack around heart

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by flocksalot, Oct 9, 2011.

  1. flocksalot

    flocksalot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had to butcher one of my BBW today unexpectedly. He had developed a hernia a few months back but appeared to be in no pain and ate enough to make me swear he had worms which he didn't. Anyway his hernia burst today so I quickly took care of him. When I pulled out his heart I was surprised to find it in a white sac that looked much like the inside of a gizzard with out the ridges, or if youv'e ever cut a heat apart and seen the white lining inside that would be it. There were four ventricles coming out of it. Which really threw me for a loop. I've never seen anything like this, so I called my poultry experts (Mom and Dad) and they haven't seen or heard of it either. So my question is have any of you ever seen this? Tall Tommy was hugh. His back was higher than any of the other toms heads. He ate like three toms put together. The other things I noticed was his liver was extremely green on the outside. I disected and it appeared normal, but was very large. His gizzard was the largest I have ever seen. My Dad has hugh hands and TT's gizzard would have been bigger. His kidneys had what I at first thought was worms on them. I think it may have been fat deposits though I'm still not sure. Everything else checked out as normal or in that range and I didn't have any real time to examine everything more in depth as my main goal was to save the meat and get it chilled. I generally raise 20 to 25 turkeys a year and grew up doing more, so in my 48 years I've seen a fair amount of inards. I have never seen the things I saw today. Any ideas as to what was going on? Curious to see if anyone else has seen this before.
     
  2. Frosty

    Frosty Chillin' With My Peeps

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  3. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Are you sure you weren't just seeing the normal serous membrane that surrounds the heart? There are two layers to the outside membrane, the outer parietal pericardium and the inner visceral pericardium. Serous fluid is secreted between the two layers and acts like a lubricant to reduce friction between them.

    Edit for typo
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2011
  4. flocksalot

    flocksalot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Nope this was thick and white the heart was inside it, but it wasn't wrapped tightly around the heart. It literally looked like a loose bag. As I stated I've done this many times, and not once have I seen some thing like this. The heart wasn't normal. It had 4 ventricles. TT wasn't unhealthy, unthrifty, or weak in any way. Yesterday he jumped the 6 foot fence to go eat in the horse pasture. He weighed 43lbs dressed. The membranes you refer to are not solid white and thick skinned. As a mater of fact I generally remove them so the heart muscle can relax better. I would have sworn that this was the inside of a gizzard with out the ridges. It was just as thick as one found in a gizzard.
     
  5. zzGypsy

    zzGypsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    so just wondering, with all the anomalies, are you eating this bird? or are you waiting until you find out what this is before you eat it?
     
  6. flocksalot

    flocksalot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:He was raised well and I know how he ate, so I have no fear of eating him. His breasts get smoked tomorrow and the rest of him is becoming soup stock. I'm not eating the heart, liver, gizzard, or any other entrails. Not because of this. I just don't like them. I generally save them for my MIL, and as much as I can't stand her I'm not going to feed her them either. I'm just curious if anyone else has ever seen this. I'm assuming these were birth defects and somehow he survied them.
     
  7. flocksalot

    flocksalot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:He didn't die from heart or pulmonary he had a hernia in his lower belly. It was a large bulge that protruded from between his legs. I checked him constantly. So much so that he got the idea that I was trying to milk him. He got really excited when ever I came around. [​IMG] Eventually the skin split and his entrails began to fall out. He needed to be processed. He weighed 43lbs dressed out, and actually I'm surprised that he didn't have problems sooner. I just kept a close eye on him and planned on butchering him when he began exhibiting signs of pain or stress. The bag like membrane that loosely surounded his heart was thick white and not at all normal. The heart was inside of it with the four arteries growing out of holes. When I first pulled it out I didn't even realize it was the heart. I thought TT had swallowed a bag. He did eat everything in sight. When I realized it was attached to things is when noticed the arteries. I'll tell you I was a bit bewildered, so much so that bloody hands and all I got out my cell. It still gives me pause every time I think about it.
     
  8. jasonm11

    jasonm11 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    post the pictures please I would be interested. I have heard of collateral veins growing to help blood flow, could this have been the case? Or maybe he ate his twin literally and the heart was a combination of both birds (double yolk egg)
     
  9. 6chickens in St. Charles

    6chickens in St. Charles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sounds very similar to the human autoimmune condition related to Scleroderma. It is genetically inherited. Hernia, tough connective tissue membranes, Marphan's style bone growth, huge appetite related to blood sugar woes (pancreatic dysfunction). I wonder if Turkeys can have autoimmune things?
     
  10. Frosty

    Frosty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    6chickens in St. Charles :

    Sounds very similar to the human autoimmune condition related to Scleroderma. It is genetically inherited. Hernia, tough connective tissue membranes, Marphan's style bone growth, huge appetite related to blood sugar woes (pancreatic dysfunction). I wonder if Turkeys can have autoimmune things?

    That is really interesting... and you might have something there. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6743362
     

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