Turkey Poults Flip Over Syndrome-F.O.S.-My experience and what I did.

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by kuntrygirl, Jun 1, 2010.

  1. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    I have noticed a few posts about turkey poults that were not able to stand up and kept flipping over. I decided to post about my experience with what I call the F.O.S. (Flip Over Syndrome). So here goes.

    My turkey hens hatched a total of 12 poults and out of those 12 poults, 3 poults had what I call the the F.O.S. (Flip Over Syndrome). When 3 of my poults were born, they could not stand for anything. They would try walking and would immediately fall on their backs and would kick their poor legs up and around to try to get back over on their feet but they were unable to get back up. I immediately removed the 3 poults from the other poults that were able to stand. I placed the poults in a medium sized box. I got 3 medium sized hand towels and rolled them up and shaped them like a “doughnut hole”. I placed each poult in their own doughnut hole towel so that the towel could support them. There was no room in the hole for them to fall back on their backs or sides. They remained in a standing or sitting position all day. They slept in a sitting position and sometimes in a leaning position. I did some research and the little information that I found told me that this is “normal” for baby poults. In my mind, I figured that I had to allow them to gain strength in their legs. Because they were unable to stand, they were unable to eat and drink, so I had to hand feed them. I also used a dropper to drop water and vitamins in their mouths. Due to the fact that I know that it is so very difficult to raise turkey poults and they can easily die if there is any early life threatening signs, I worked effortlessly to get these babies up and walking. I placed the box in the bed with me on the first night so that I could roll over and check on them throughout the night. I didn’t want to take a chance and have anything happen to them on my watch. Once I felt that it was okay to leave them alone on the side of the bed, I was able to do that on the next night. I also placed a heat lamp in the box for warmth being as though they were days old. The night that they were in bed with me, I placed a light blanket on top of them for heat. The towel itself kept them warm as well. Throughout the course of the next days, I would take them out of the doughnut holes for a few minutes to see how they were progressing. They were still flipping over after 24 hours. Around the 3rd day, I could see improvement. They were able to walk although they stumbled a bit. They flipped over a few times but they were able to get back up after a few seconds. On the 4th day, the F.O.S. (Flip Over Syndrome) was gone. They were able to walk straight with no more flip overs. I put them with mama and sisters and brothers about the 5th day. They were able to keep up with no problems.

    I have read somewhere that their chances of surviving when they experience flip overs are slim to none but I always try my best to beat the odds. These little girls and boys survived with a lot of hard work and time. They wanted to live and I desperately wanted them to live.

    I am in no way a turkey whisperer or a turkey expert. I can only explain my experiences and what I did. I hope that this can help someone who is experiencing or will experience this problem with their turkey poults.
     
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  2. Plain_View_Farm

    Plain_View_Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You sound a lot like me in the respect I will do what I can to save what I call "Flippers" I had 2 in my second turkey batch this year. I lost one from being trampled and I wasn't about to let that happen to the second one. So, for 2 days I wrapped the poult in a paper towel, put it in my shirt pocket and carried it to work with me. I had a little box, 3" wide, 4" tall and 12" long I kept it in with a light on one side for heat. The box was wide enough that it could move about and if it tipped sideways the box would hold it up. I had to stand it up a few times during the day but it seemed content. At night I put the little box in the brooder with the rest of the poults and put a hand towel in to keep it from walking around. Then the next day, back in my pocket.
    While the whole time I kept calling it a She, I am thinking this last week I may have been mistaken. So Matilda will likely be Timmy in the end.

    So yes there are ways to deal with "Flippers" if your willing to spend the time.
    David
     
  3. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much for this information, it is really helpful.

    I'm going to try to save my flipper. I don't know if it will work, but it's worth a try.
     
  4. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:Good Job!!! I always love to read stories like yours.
     
  5. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:Good luck. Definitely worth a try. Please know that you have a lot of us who can help you through this to the best of our abilities, knowledge and experience . Please don't hesitate to ask. We are always here.
     
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  6. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, I'm happy to report that this approach does seem to be working with my "flipper" and also with another chick that hatched out late, was very large and weak. I have both of them together in a turkey N.I.C.U. and I've been hand feeding or force-feeding with a syringe barrell sans needle as necessary, plus dipping their beaks into Pedialyte frequently so they drink. Both of them seem to be gaining strength. The flipper is now able to get up and walk around without falling over very often, although when it does fall I still have to right it.

    But, definitely progress.
     
  7. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:[​IMG]

    Glad to hear that your babies seem to be doing better. I hope that they continue to get stronger and show even greater improvement. Please keep us posted on their status. Thanks for the update.
     
  8. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    I know you want to save your poults and I don't normally post on these threads but to save a weakling you weaken your flock. It does sound cruel but natures way is only the strong survive. If you save your flipper to breeding age them you will have more flippers. [​IMG] What we have done over the years is cull all the weaklings... Please don't take this the wrong way it's just one opinion.

    Steve
     
  9. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:How does it weaken your flock? Besides the obvious which would be you stand a chance of having more "flippers" and you may have to do the same thing as far as separating them while they get stronger, do they transmit any diseases, etc. to the rest of the flock and kill everyone else? I'm no expert, so I'm still learning all I can about turkeys. I was just curious to know.
     
  10. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Steve, I certainly appreciate your comment, and it makes perfect sense for "normal" purposes. However, my birds are strictly pets, just to complete my "farm" feeling on my couple of acres. I would only be breeding for replacement purposes as/if these were to age or otherwise be lost, and I could definitely control which ones would be the parents.

    And yes, I'm sure that breeding these weak ones could possibly result in genetics that could perpetuate and even increasing the odds of this happening.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2010

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