Turkey Sexing tips?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by Silkiesarefluffydinos, May 23, 2019.

  1. Silkiesarefluffydinos

    Silkiesarefluffydinos Songster

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    Hey ya'll! We recently got some turkey poults and they are now close to 5 weeks old, except for the 3 Blue slates, who are about 3-4 weeks old. We have 3 Bronze, one red bournon and 3 Blue Slates.I don't know how old you are able to start sexing them based off Physical features, but I found out one was a Tom when he puffed his feathers out and fanned jus tail like ive seen some friend's turkeys do.are there any behaviors I shul look our for that could tell me what their gender is? I know it's too young for the blue slates, although I noticed one has a dark dot on its head, while the other two do not. Is it like with some chickens where a dot means a hen(or rooster)? This is our first time keeping Turkeys, so any help would be appreciated! The second brown turkey is the one I know is a tom.
     

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  2. Silkiesarefluffydinos

    Silkiesarefluffydinos Songster

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    Oct 16, 2017
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    here's the rest of the pictures
     

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  3. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

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    None of your poults are old enough to sex from pictures. The one that has strutted for you may well be a young tom but female poults have also been known to strut at that age. It is more of a dominance statement than it is a sex identifier.

    The black dot on the Blue Slate's head means nothing. Blue Slates have random black dots that change with each molt.

    Sex defining characteristics start showing up at about 3 months of age but may take even longer to show for late developing toms.

    Dark feathered hens will have light colored edges on their mature breast feathers while toms will have dark colored edges on their mature breast feathers. It has to be the adult breast feathers since the juvenile breast feathers with have light colored lower edges for both sexes.

    Toms will develop bigger caruncles than hens will.

    The snood of a tom will be able to swell up and hang well past (several inches or more) the end of his beak and when retracted will form a cone on the tom's head. A hen's snood may swell up but is unlikely to ever reach any farther than the end of her beak and will retract to a horizontal J shape.

    Toms will develop a bald head devoid of feathers with a few scattered hairs here and there. Hens will have a "mohawk" running up the back of their neck and on to the top of their head.

    Toms will have heavier legs than hens.

    Toms will grow spurs as they age. Hens may develop spur nubs.
     
  4. Silkiesarefluffydinos

    Silkiesarefluffydinos Songster

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    Oct 16, 2017
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    Thanks for the help!
     
    R2elk likes this.

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