1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Turkeys badly injured- don't know whether to put them out of misery

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chickenannie, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,156
    21
    231
    Nov 19, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    Had a fox attack very early this morning. I went out to feed before work and found them. 2 BR turkeys killed and 2 very badly wounded. I don't think the tom will make it, but I don't know whether to try to help them, just let them alone see how it goes, or put them out of their misery. I brought them in the house where it's warm, with food and water (they're not at ALL interested).

    The RB tom is bleeding from the chest slowly -- much of the flesh pulled off and various wounds. He's unable to walk, just shivering and about to give up and looks very bad off. His eyes will open when I come in though. I'm not even sure how I would treat him.

    The RB hen was slowly limping, but her whole side has the flesh pulled off. She's in the best shape, but I also don't know how to treat her. She's just laying there with her head down,

    They hate being handled and before when I've tried to treat wounds the birds get VERY stressed out, trying to get away from me and that seems to make things worse.

    Anyone?
     
  2. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    24,442
    46
    371
    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    Are you raising them for food?

    If you harvest them now they will be edible. If you wait and infection sets in or they die from the injury you shouldn't eat them.

    If they are suffering, you need to put them out of their misery.

    If you plan to nurse them, no one can promie a good outcome. You'll have to bring them in to a warm place and tend their wound several times a day. Rinse with warmish saline. Clean with a iodine wash. Apply neosporin to the wounds. If they are severe sew them up.

    Good luck with what you choose.
     
  3. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,156
    21
    231
    Nov 19, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    Thanks, miss prissy.
    They're still alive. The hen is now worse off than the tom. I hadn't noticed her large neck wound previously. A friend who's a doctor stopped by and he stitched up the wounds on both birds, but he doesn't think they're going to make it. I am so thankful to him for being willing to try, though. They are both very very thirsty so I've been putting eyedroppers full into their beaks in the hope that some will get down the throat.
     
  4. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,156
    21
    231
    Nov 19, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    We did all that suturing, and now I don't think the hens going to make it. [​IMG]
     
  5. jhm47

    jhm47 Chillin' With My Peeps

    575
    6
    141
    Sep 7, 2008
    You might be totally amazed with the healing power of these birds. Allow them to have access to water, and some feed, and allow them to rest for a few days, and you might be pleasantly surprised. Keep them hydrated and in a fairly dark place where they can rest undisturbed. After a day or two, you might allow them to eat a small amount. Gradually increase their feed each day. Turkeys are amazingly tough, if healthy. They die easily if they contract a disease. Good luck!
     
  6. Emzyyy

    Emzyyy Runs with Deer

    Jul 14, 2008
    Derby Kansas
    I'd keep tryin' you would be surprised. [​IMG]
     
  7. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,156
    21
    231
    Nov 19, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    Thanks for the encouragement. I think the hen is on her last legs. Waiting for a miracle. And the tom is having all sorts of secondary problems I hadn't counted on, like he can't hold his head up and his wattles are full of blood. I sacrificed a pillow so he can keep his head up higher, but I don't think he's going to make it either.

    This is so hard. I'm really questioning this. If I think about it from the turkey's perspective, maybe it would've been better to just end their lives after seeing their wounds, rather than make them go through the suturing and now this suffering. These are my breeding birds, maybe I was selfish in wanting to keep them alive and trying to treat them. But I felt like once I decided to treat them, I had to continue with it, cuz i don't know -- there's a very slim chance that they could recover, like you both said.
     
  8. Attack Chicken

    Attack Chicken [IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.2.7[/IMG] Hu

    Sep 25, 2008
    Indianapolis, IN
    I'm so sorry this happend *hugs* Hopefully a miracle will happen for you. You must get that fox out of there before it happens again.
     
  9. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,156
    21
    231
    Nov 19, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    I have a fox trapper who's had traps here since end of October. And, I laced the outside of the pasture fence with extra chicken wire down to the ground. I think the fox JUMPED over a 4.5 foot high fence. That's the only way he couldve gotten in.
     
  10. nnbreeder

    nnbreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,761
    29
    210
    Jun 22, 2008
    Oklahoma
    Fox are excellent climbers, jumpers and diggers.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by