two hens with injuries

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by silkiemother, Apr 23, 2019.

  1. silkiemother

    silkiemother Songster

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    I went out to lock up my hens last night and when I moved one of them , I noticed that she was missing quite a few feathers on her back and she had a huge, still slightly bleeding wound on her back. I separated her and went to do the rest of the hens and stumpy had the same injury, in the same exact spot. I put her in with diamond and went on to do the rest of the hens and no one else had any other injuries. What caused this? And no, there is no other hens or any roosters in with them, only my two ducks and ruby the hen, who has a healing broken leg. what should I do for them? I can try to get pictures
     
  2. azygous

    azygous Crossing the Road

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    The only way you or we can know what injured your two hens is if you have a surveillance camera and we watch the footage.

    We can imagine a few scenarios. Free ranging chickens can have this kind of damage from a hawk diving at them and only being able to grab some feathers while raking its talons across the chickens' backs.

    There could be exposed ragged chicken wire at the top of a chicken door. A dog could have tried to grab the hens and came away empty as the hawk did.

    Clean the wounds with soap and water and spray with Vetericyn sound spray.
     
    Sequel and EggSighted4Life like this.
  3. silkiemother

    silkiemother Songster

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    well, all I can tell you is that they are not free ranging hens,there is no way a dog or a hawk could have gotten them . do you think my drake could have done it? and also, for some reason, the wounds are perfectly circular
     
  4. azygous

    azygous Crossing the Road

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    How about posting a photo?
     
  5. Shadrach

    Shadrach Roosterist

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    If they don't free range and it isn't possible for a hawk to gain access, and with the wound being circular and identical on both chickens, then it would seem likely that one of your ducks is responsible.
    The question is, how big is huge? If it's the size of a dinner plate, you can probably rule out the duck.
    If it's about the width of a ducks bill then the duck would seem likely.
     
    azygous likes this.
  6. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

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    Yes your drake could well be responsible and he could also cause internal injury and infection from trying to mate them, which he is likely to do if he does not have enough female ducks to keep him satisfied. I would pen the ducks separately and consider getting more females for him as the one he currently has may have a rough time.... particularly if he is young.
     
    Wyorp Rock, sourland and azygous like this.
  7. danceswithronin

    danceswithronin Crowing

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    Are the ducks drakes? Ducks can sometimes try to mate hens if they're sexually frustrated, and they can be very rough.
     
  8. silkiemother

    silkiemother Songster

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    one drake, one female duck, and the injuries are about.... 2 inches in diameter and are located about an inch above the tail
     
  9. danceswithronin

    danceswithronin Crowing

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    Hmmm, weird. I would expect the injuries to be higher on the back (closer to the neck) if it was the drake.
     
  10. silkiemother

    silkiemother Songster

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    I am wishing now that I did have a game camera so I could figure out how it happened
     

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