Two Little Boys + One Grown Girly = HELP?!?!?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by jazzabelle, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. jazzabelle

    jazzabelle New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Dec 7, 2010
    Okay so heres the situation.
    About 9 weeks ago we bought three little pekin bantam chicks.
    Unfortunately one was too little and died.
    So we were left with two.
    Yesterday, I posted a topic with photos asking for help determining the gender. And well, of course its my luck, and we have been blessed with two little boys, despite the breeders assuring us that the unsexed little dearies were most probably hens. Anyway, so i'm stuck knowing what to do.
    Moving the little fellas into a nice hole in the ground isnt an option, nor is christmas lunch. At this stage we do want to keep them. HOWEVER, we only have one hen.
    So, my question is, how many hens should i get to accounter for the two roosters?

    Please note that the roosters have grown up together and are basically inseperable. They chirp and dont stop chirping if the other is missing.

    Thanks in advance.
    xx [​IMG]
     
  2. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,873
    15
    191
    Sep 9, 2009
    Olympia, WA
    [​IMG]

    Rule of thumb is 1 roo for 10 hens. Depending on things (amount of room, temperment, breed, etc) you could get away with less or need more. It's also possible that as they mature they'll fight though that is by no means certain. I almost always have 2-3 adult roos and a few younger ones running around and seldom have problems with fighting. It's only when a lower ranking roo won't accept his place that there is problems around here. If that is too many hens for you to think about keeping you could also try putting saddles on the girls to minimze damage from overmating. They'll probably still be stressed out from all the "attention" though. Another option (and quite possibly the best one for you) is to set up a bachelor pad for the boys away from the girls (less incentive for them to fight that way) and get your hen a few other girls for company.

    Please read up on quarantine before adding any more birds though. I've seen way too many threads on here where folks have lost their flocks after brining in new birds because they didn't quarintine first. It's more of a problem with adult birds then it is with chicks, but either way I think it's very worthwhile to read up on it so you can make an educated decision. Integrating new birds can also be a challenge, but done properly it's usually not too bad--lots of threads on that too. The search button on the blue bar at the top of the page is your friend--and the community is super helpfull too for any questions you can't find the answer too or just aren't sure about.
     
  3. midget_farms

    midget_farms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 15, 2008
    Dunlap Illinois
    that was all good advice. If you are sure you want to keep them both you will need to seperate them or add more hens.

    I currently have 15 hens & 2 roosters. 1 is the top guy & he keeps 11 hens for himself & lets the other roo have 4 (the ugly ones). The other guy occasionally runs a panty raid on one of the opposing hens & will get chased all around the yard for his trouble.

    I think best thing for you if you cant have a large flock & don't want to sell one roo is to keep one (or both) seperate from the hens all together.

    Someone out there is just dying to have a pekin bantam roo (no one eats bantam's anyway) & they may be willing to take him off your hands & ensure a good home.

    Unfortunately in this hobby/business you ALWAYS have more roosters than you want. You only need 1 but half the darn eggs are boys!
     
  4. jazzabelle

    jazzabelle New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Dec 7, 2010
    Just wondering, because they free range, does that minimise the amount of hens that i need to get, or is it just better off getting rid of one?
     
  5. midget_farms

    midget_farms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 15, 2008
    Dunlap Illinois
    Free ranging helps - because the top roo will chase the lesser one & if they are free he can run away.

    If however your lesser roo believes he is the top roo they will fight no matter what. It just how they are.

    Keep in mind though especially in winter they will be cooped up together. My younger roo stands in the farthest away nest box all night because the top guy wont let him on the roost. They wont go outside in the snow. I thing they believe they are on the moon or something.

    So - my point is - they will need lots of coop space too in order to get along.
     
  6. jazzabelle

    jazzabelle New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Dec 7, 2010
    So - my point is - they will need lots of coop space too in order to get along.

    That shouldnt be a problem, they will still be free ranging in winter too.
    I live in Brisbane Australia, so it doesnt even get close too snow.

    so with that in mind, how many hens do you suggest?​
     
  7. midget_farms

    midget_farms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 15, 2008
    Dunlap Illinois
    You generally want 10 per rooster - but you can need a lot less or a lot more.

    My guess is - because yours are banty's you can get by with maybe 8 total. That should give them enough company that they can each pick a favorite & just chase the others around.

    If you find one of the roos becomes aggressive you will need to add more & put in a rooster training program of carying them around by their feet at least once per day.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by