Two or three chicks ?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Leigti, Feb 11, 2016.

  1. Leigti

    Leigti Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am thinking about getting a couple baby chicks to add to my flock. Two would bring me up to the maximum number that I can have, or should I say that I should have :). But I am worried that if I get two and one dies or turns out to be a rooster then I will have to try to integrate one into a flock which I have read often is a big problem. Should I get three just in case or risk it with two? I've only had baby chicks one other time but they all lived to maturity so maybe I am just being paranoid. Any suggestions would be great.
     
  2. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, if you arrange in advance for somewhere for extras/roosters to go, I would get extra. That way you've got bases covered no matter what.
     
  3. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Are you ordering chicks, getting them at the feed store or a person.
    You may have options. Depending on the time of year, some hatcheries have a minimum order of 3 on sexed chicks. Usually the feed store had sexed chicks as well. If you are getting them from a person, then it's a gamble. You may end of with all girls, all boys or a mix.
     
  4. Leigti

    Leigti Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'll be getting them from the feed store. I don't know what their policies are on returning it etc. if it's a boy. But I could find it a home even though it will probably end up being chicken dinner. Which makes me sad but have to be practical. It would be much harder to get rid of a female . I think I'll get three and hope it works out. Would 20 pounds of feed get the three through till the time they need layer feed? I ferment the feed.
     
  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I would ask the feed store what their policy is on return chicks.
    As far as the food question, I have no idea. Really depends of when they start to lay. Chick starter can be fed even after they begin to lay so it's not wasted, you just want to make sure to give them oyster shell for added calcium. Then you can switch to layer feed or use an all flock type feed.
     
  6. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No. Count on 10# of feed per chick to 10 weeks. 50# will get the 3 to about 16 weeks.
     
  7. ChickenChaser9

    ChickenChaser9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello Leigti,
    I would recommend erring on the side of 'more chicken is good' in most cases because well, I love chickens. It would not be difficult to sell your 'extras' online or turn your friends and family on to the wonderful world of chicken rearing. Mostly I would give consideration to what breed you want to introduce to your flock and why before making your purchase. If you do chose/end up only introducing a single new bird to your flock this would not be impossible to do, you have only a few hurdles to overcome most of which simply require some attention and oversight on your part. If you take an active hand in the introductions/integration by controlling how they meet and how much time they spend together initially you can prevent they worst of the 'bullying' although it will be in the flock's nature to put the newer/smaller chickens at the bottom of the pecking order, the onus still falls upon we humans to ensure that the transition period goes smoothly. This can be done and as many people will tell you, a mixed flock both in breeds and ages can function and be a very healthy and productive flock.
     
  8. appps

    appps Overrun With Chickens

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    If you are buying straight run I'd go with three because you would be lucky to get three girls. If you are buying sexed I'd probably risk the two.

    Do a bit of a search on integrating young birds safely, I've done it both ways and adding them at about 5 weeks was heaps easier than when they were mature.
     
  9. Leigti

    Leigti Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Interesting, everything I've read so far says wait till they are about the same size as the adults. The two places I have contacted both say that the checks have been sexed so it would not be straight run.
     
  10. aldarita

    aldarita Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have made 4 integrations in my short time of keeping chickens (4 years). I read about integration in the forum and other sources and mostly found out that it is better to do it when the chickens are about the same size so they can defend themselves and this is what I have done so far , however recently I have been very interested in reading some of the posts of very experienced posters that integrate 6 weeks chicks and they have very detailed descriptions of how it is done. The premise is that being so young the adults don't see them as a threat. I am getting 3 chicks in April and I am planning to integrate them into a flock of 4 (3 hens and a rooster) when they are 6 weeks old. There are many factors that can contribute to a successful or unsuccessful integration, it requires a lot of supervision but it can be done.
    Regarding the number of chicks you want to get (2 or 3) I would go for 3, it is easier to integrate and if something happens to one, you still have 2 left.
     

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