Two Roosters and one Hen!!!!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by minksroost, Jan 6, 2013.

  1. minksroost

    minksroost Out Of The Brooder

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    [VIDEO][​IMG][/VIDEO]ok. So we are new to chickens but loving it. sort of started by accident when we rescued an Ameraucana pullet from a Sheetz gas station parking lot. totally weird. anyway, asked a friend to hold her until we could build a coop then brought her home. realized quickly that they like company. got two 12 week pullets (supposed to be) for company and have since found out they are cockerials. I can't have two roosters and one Hen. We plan to get 3 pullets in the spring but still two roosters is too many. was hoping for suggestions on placing them. they are friendly and I didn't want to list "free" roosters on Craig's list for fear they would end up on dinner plate. one is a white Leghorn and the other is RIR (We believe). he is not all red. has beautiful varied colors of reds on back and some white and dark red tail feathers. anyone have any ideas on how to rehome safely? maybe I'll see if I can figure out how to post a pic and someone can confirm breed. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  2. willowbranchfarm

    willowbranchfarm Chicken Boots

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    The red/brown one looks like a Red Sex Link Rooster.
     
  3. minksroost

    minksroost Out Of The Brooder

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    How can you tell it's a "sex link". what trait do you look for. We thought sex links were always female?? is that not the case. someone bought "sex link" at tractor supply and was told that meant they were all females. would love to know what traits to look for.
     
  4. willowbranchfarm

    willowbranchfarm Chicken Boots

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  5. minksroost

    minksroost Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks I'll check it out. I probably won't know what will happen to them if I 're- home will I? I hope to find an honest person.
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Read the first post in this thread for really good information on sex links.

    Tadkerson’s Sex Link Thread
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=261208

    The idea of a sex link is that you can tell at hatch which are female and which are male. The three most common ways for us are red sex links, black sex links, and feather sexing. There are some other ways but why complicate it even more in a basic explanation? In all three of these cases the parents have to be set up right genetically or it won’t work. With the red and black sex links it’s about down color.

    With red sex links the female chicks will have reddish down and the males will be yellow. This might be all over or just at certain body parts depending on what other genes are present.

    With black sex links the females will not be barred and the males will be barred. The difference in the chicks is that the males will have a spot on their head while the females will not. Whether or not you can see that spot depends on down color. With some crosses it is really clear and with some it can be pretty tricky.

    With feather sexing, the males will have the slow feathering and the females will be fast feathering.

    I seriously doubt that red rooster is a sex links. A red sex link rooster is actually white. There can be some red leakage but his base color will be white. Clearly not the case.

    Sex links sold at feed stores are generally female. They are easy to tell apart from the males and people want females. An equal number of males are hatched but those don’t generally make it to people’s flocks or the feed stores.

    What traits do you look for to tell if it is a sex link? You have to know what the parents are genetically. You can make a hen or rooster that looks like a sex link from other crosses.

    That red one looks like a cross of some type. I’m not going to try to guess breeds though I'd guess he did not come from a feed store.

    Good luck on the rehoming. Once you give him away or sell him, you lose control.
     
  7. minksroost

    minksroost Out Of The Brooder

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    Correct neither the red or white came from a feed store. My daughter in law bought 10 sex links at a feed store. She had rescued a rooster and he was incorporated into the flock which of course ended with a broody hen and thus two hatchlings. The mother was a redish chicken. I can't remember what color the rooster is but I'm going to find out. I guess it really doesn't matter on the breed. It would be too hard since her original chicks came from the feed store. Thanks for all the info on sex links - geez.. sounds like an exact science we will definately have to study up on. We don't plan to have a large flock though. I"m totally bummed about the roosters as I am a dedicated animal caregiver. Once I take on the responsibility it's not just an obligation I do put my heart into it. So giving one away without knowing what will happen will be too difficult. Do you know if the two will fight each other for the hens or will one be the dominant one and the other will not bother the hens. They don't bother each other now but then again they are only 24 wks. They are crowing though. The red appears to be the one in charge as the white is submissive to both the rooster and the hen. Everything I've read says two roosters will try to kill the other. I was just wondering since they grew up together is this is still the case?
     
  8. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    You read a lot on the internet. Some of it is even true. Remember you are reading what I’m writing on the internet. Inspires confidence doesn’t it?

    I generally suggest keeping as few roosters as you can and still meet your goals. The more roosters you have the more possibility you have of seeing problems. There is a big difference in what can possibly happen and what will actually happen. A lot of people seem to have problems understanding that difference.

    Many flocks have multiple roosters. Sometimes this causes problems but often it does not. One rooster will be dominant. Sometimes this is determined by fighting, sometimes by pure intimidation. It can occasionally involve a fight to the death though often it is a lot more a quick skirmish then a lot of chasing and running away.

    They are living animals. I can’t tell you what will happen with yours. It is possible they will continue as they are. It is possible that there will be skirmishes or even serious fighting as they continue to mature. They will probably be able to coexist but I can’t give you any guarantees.

    Another possibility is that the hen will be over-mated. That possibility is tremendously overrated on this forum, but it is a possibility. If it has not happened yet, it probably won’t. That risk is much greater when they are still juveniles and not fully mature. At 24 weeks yours have some maturing to do but it’s looking pretty good for you.

    What you are looking for in overmating is that the hen can lose so many feathers on her back that the rooster can cut her skin with his claws or possible spurs when he grows them. At 24 weeks your roosters probably don’t have much for spurs. It’s not unusual for a hen to lose a few feathers. What you are looking for is bare spots. If you are seeing that problem then we need to discuss it.

    Contrary to a popular belief on this forum, that loss of feathers is often related to poor feather quality on the hen (her feathers are too brittle) rather than the rooster’s technique, but some roosters do have really bad technique.

    Another possibility is that the hen is so stressed out she stays on the roosts most if the day and tries to avoid the roosters. They usually grow out of this as they mature, but sometimes a rooster can be a real brute. I find that the hens are more likely to be brutish toward each other than a rooster is toward his hens, but they are living animals and anything can happen.

    My goals are different than yours. I raise chickens to eat so I’d have a simple solution to your dilemma. If it were me, I would not keep the extra rooster, not because it is a guarantee of problems but because it increases the possibility of problems. You can try keeping them both and see what happens. It might work out for you or it might not.

    Good luck!!!
     
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  9. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    If you're allowed to have roosters where you live, simply seperate them from the hen. I'm not near as worried about two roosters who grow up together trying to kill each other as I am a single hen being ganged up on. Roosters usually do fine in a bachelor pad. Some squabbles are normal, but you'll get that with two intact males of any species!
     
  10. minksroost

    minksroost Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 27, 2012
    Richmond, Virginia
    the two are getting along fine now. the red is the dominant for sure and the other doesn't push the issue. I agree with you in the fact that I would be better off 're- homing one. difficult for me since yes I'm attached already to them. I mentioned separating to my husband but he didn't seem thrilled to say the least of building another coop. We went way over the top on our coop. I was concerned about predators. We live in a very rural area so we don't have to worry about neighbors or ordnance's thank goodness. I appreciate all the info. I'm wondering if I should just keep watching the behavior and get to spring and get 3 hens. fingers crossed that this won't cause the submissive rooster to start pushing back.
     

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