Two roosters, two hens

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Nolagurl1956, Jul 10, 2018.

  1. Nolagurl1956

    Nolagurl1956 Chirping

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    in early spring I purchased four Wyandottes from a breeder in Bogalusa. Unfortunately two are roosters which of course will not work since I only have two hens. What to do? I know I have to give away or sell one of the roosters. How do I do that? It’s a shame as I’ve become attached to all four birds and it seems to me that the breeder should have known what he was selling me. I’m sure it is a roll of the dice but the chicks were 2-3 months old and at the time I received the birds, I D6BC6121-0E74-4F5D-AF0C-71B4535BCB88.jpeg FC87970B-D640-4EB4-8E65-CF4696729811.jpeg pretty much picked out who was going to be a cockerel vs a hen...
     
  2. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Did you purchase 'pullets', and did he guarantee no males??
    If so, you might give him a call and see if he'll swap out the males for females.
    Wy's can be harder to sex at 6 weeks like most other breeds.

    If you need to get rid of the males and don't want to eat them,
    craigslist, local poultry groups on facebook, local feed mill, or other advertising venues might do the trick. Do not specify 'pet only home' to move them much faster.
    SLW are not your typical breed, so you may have some luck due to that.
     
  3. Nolagurl1956

    Nolagurl1956 Chirping

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    No I wanted one rooster and three hens and the birds were 2-3 months old when he shipped them to me. From my research it seems to me the breeder should have been to determine the sex of the birds by that age, but what do I really know.
    Thanks for your suggestions.
     
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  4. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Crowing

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    well I have had chickens for years, and I would assume that I would recognize a rooster, but was totally surprised when one crowed on me a couple of years ago, it happens.

    In a very small flock like yours, I would recommend all hens. They will be happier.
    Art gave good advice on getting rid of the roosters, so I won't repeat. Your might ask at the feed store or local poultry club are some other options.
     
  5. llombardo

    llombardo Crowing

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    I had the same thing happen to me. I finally did seperate the roosters. One is in the house until I can build his own area. I left the silver lace with 2 soon to be 6 girls. He is pretty calm all the way around, even with mating. I'm not seeing any feathers flying yet. They are just over 4 months now. The other 4 girls are about 6 weeks younger

    image.jpg
     
  6. Nolagurl1956

    Nolagurl1956 Chirping

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    So you think it would be best to give away both roosters and just have two hens. There are so many different opinions about the need for a rooster for protection. Thanks.
     
  7. Nolagurl1956

    Nolagurl1956 Chirping

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    It is so confusing...
     
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  8. Shamo Hybrid

    Shamo Hybrid Songster

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    If they all get along, I don't see the reason for wanting to get rid of one or both or the roosters.
     
  9. Nolagurl1956

    Nolagurl1956 Chirping

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    Thanks. I see aggressive behavior between the roos and one of them picks on the hens so I think it might be best to see if the one who seems more gentle get along with the hens. Thank you.
     
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  10. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Crowing

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    I would be in favor of adding two more hens, and removing the roosters....however, I am just guessing at your set up. A first year flock, all hens is a good one to start with. As to them all getting along, once the hormone become active, this can be, most generally is a wreck with two on two.

    As for protection, a rooster is not worth much protection until he is a year old, not all roosters are good roosters, not all become flock masters. It would be best to separate the pullets until they begin to lay.
     

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