Two week chick laying on side, can't stand properly?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chirrup121, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. chirrup121

    chirrup121 Out Of The Brooder

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    1) What type of bird , age and weight (does the chicken seem or feel lighter or thinner than the others.)

    I was never told the breed, most likely New Hampshire Red or Buff Orpington chickens. Age is two weeks. The chicken seems to be the same weight as my other two.

    2) What is the behavior, exactly.

    She cannot stand up properly and sways a little from side to side. When she is resting/sitting, she rests on the leg part rather than actually standing. The claws seem to curl in when she tries to walk. She also seems like she cannot move very well as she tends to fall onto her side.

    3) How long has the bird been exhibiting symptoms?

    Since this morning.

    4) Are other birds exhibiting the same symptoms?

    No. They are very lively

    5) Is there any bleeding, injury, broken bones or other sign of trauma.

    I don't think so.

    6) What happened, if anything that you know of, that may have caused the situation.

    I'm not sure.

    7) What has the bird been eating and drinking, if at all.

    She's willing to eat white rice (that has been crushed) and drinking water.

    8) How does the poop look? Normal? Bloody? Runny? etc.

    Before it was runny and yellowish coloured but has since turned green with a brown cap.

    9) What has been the treatment you have administered so far?

    I have separated the chicken from the others.

    10 ) What is your intent as far as treatment? For example, do you want to treat completely yourself, or do you need help in stabilizing the bird til you can get to a vet?

    I'm not sure. I don't know if there is an avian vet in my area (I live in Sydney, Australia)

    11) If you have a picture of the wound or condition, please post it. It may help.

    to edit

    12) Describe the housing/bedding in use

    to edit
     
  2. chirrup121

    chirrup121 Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]

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  3. chirrup121

    chirrup121 Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay I found the details of an avian vet so I want to be able to make my chicken as comfortable as possible as there will be a while before I can see the vet :(
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Could you get a picture of her on your level standing? She may have a vitamin B2 or riboflavin deficiency, but she also could have a leg bone deformity, such as a slipped tendon among others. I would immediately place her on vitamins in her water that includes riboflavin, or you can give her 2-3 drops of PolyVisol without iron baby vitamins. Here are some links to read that may be of help while you are getting a picture (in first link , click on each page to enlarge pictures):
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1790586/
    https://sites.google.com/a/poultrypedia.com/poultrypedia/poultry-podiatry
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/756556/slipped-tendon-splayed-leg-confused

    RIBOFLAVIN DEFICIENCY

    Many tissues may be affected by riboflavin deficiency, although the epithelium and the myelin sheaths of some of the main nerves are major targets. Changes in the sciatic nerves produce “curled-toe” paralysis in growing chickens. Egg production is affected, and riboflavin-deficient eggs do not hatch. When chicks are fed a diet deficient in riboflavin, their appetite is fairly good but they grow slowly, become weak and emaciated, and develop diarrhea between the first and second weeks. Deficient chicks are reluctant to move unless forced and then frequently walk on their hocks with the aid of their wings. The leg muscles are atrophied and flabby, and the skin is dry and harsh. In advanced stages of deficiency, the chicks lie prostrate with their legs extended, sometimes in opposite directions. The characteristic sign of riboflavin deficiency is a marked enlargement of the sciatic and brachial nerve sheaths; sciatic nerves usually show the most pronounced effects. Histologic examination of the affected nerves shows degenerative changes in the myelin sheaths that, when severe, pinch the nerve. This produces a permanent stimulus, which causes the curled-toe paralysis.
    Signs of riboflavin deficiency in the hen are decreased egg production, increased embryonic mortality, and an increase in size and fat content of the liver. Hatchability declines within 2 wk when hens are fed a riboflavin-deficient diet, but returns to near normal when riboflavin is restored. Affected embryos are dwarfed and show characteristically defective “clubbed” down. The nervous system of these embryos shows degenerative changes much like those described in riboflavin-deficient chicks.
    Signs of riboflavin deficiency first appear at 10 days of incubation, when embryos become hypoglycemic and accumulate intermediates of fatty acid oxidation. Although flavin-dependent enzymes are depressed with riboflavin deficiency, the main effect seems to be impaired fatty acid oxidation, which is a critical function in the developing embryo. An autosomal recessive trait blocks the formation of the riboflavin-binding protein needed for transport of riboflavin to the egg. While the adults appear normal, their eggs fail to hatch regardless of dietary riboflavin content. As eggs become deficient in riboflavin, the egg albumen loses its characteristic yellow color. In fact, albumen color score has been used to assess riboflavin status of birds.
    Chicks receiving diets only partially deficient in riboflavin may recover spontaneously, indicating that the requirement rapidly decreases with age. A 100-μg dose should be sufficient for treatment of riboflavin-deficient chicks, followed by incorporation of an adequate level in the diet. However, when the curled-toe deformity is longstanding, irreparable damage occurs in the sciatic nerve, and the administration of riboflavin is no longer curative.
    Most diets contain up to 10 mg riboflavin/kg. Treatment can be given as two 100 μg doses for chicks or poults, followed by an adequate amount of riboflavin in feed.
     
  5. chirrup121

    chirrup121 Out Of The Brooder

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    Is this an okay photo? It does seem a lot like the slipped tendon issue though.
     
  6. chirrup121

    chirrup121 Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]

    Sorry forgot the image
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    southern Ohio
    It could be a slipped tendon, but I'm not an expert. The pictures below look to me like a slipped tendon, but that term is outdated if you read some of the links provided. Those are very difficult to fix, but there are instructions in the poultry pedia link. Most leg bone deformities can lead to a ruptured gastrocnemius tendon in the hock as the problem worsens with age. Many will cull these chicks if they get worse, but some choose to let the chicks try to survive with extra care. The important thing is to try and figure out the real problem fist. Vitamins are always useful, because a riboflavin deficiency if treated early, may improve to normal. Here are a couple more links to read:
    http://nhjy.hzau.edu.cn/kech/synkx/dong/2bao/Bone disorders in poultry.pdf
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/publications/6/diseases-of-poultry/220/slipped-tendon-perosis

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  8. chirrup121

    chirrup121 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! I'll be seeing an avian vet soon so hopefully it is cleared up.
     
  9. chirrup121

    chirrup121 Out Of The Brooder

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    Just got a quote and there is no way I can actually afford the bill :( I'll try adding some riboflavin and see how it goes
     

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