Two week old chicks with lice

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by xtetra, Apr 5, 2012.

  1. xtetra

    xtetra Out Of The Brooder

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    I bought 8 chicks two weeks ago and all was well. I bought 6 more Monday from a large store whose name I wont mention. I was skeptical of the black sexlinks but somehow talked myself into buying two. That was a mistake and I'm not going to bother justifying it. I think this pair brought the lice onto the brooder. They looked a little ruffled but the store had a ton of them in one brooder a day or so before, so I thought it was just from being crowded.

    This am I noticed a flat white thing on the back of one of my older chicks (a silkie) I did a little reading and did the following:

    -Put the chicks in a pair or boxes with about 1/8 inch of hardwood ash on the bottom (which a few of them dust bathed in) while I removed the pine shavings from the brooder (metal tub style)

    -Took the bedding outside

    -Dusted the brooder tub with Rotenone 1%, ensuring any recessed areas/seams got dusted.

    -Put in fresh shavings

    -Washed the feeder and waterer

    -Put a little Rotenone on my finger tips and then dusted gently the backs and wings/underwings of each chick with it?

    -The black sex links had some small bald spots so I treated them with a light coat of olive oil.

    -Each chick went back in the brooder one at a time after being treated.

    Did I do OK? I'm kinda freakin out here...first time raising chicks.

    Any comments or Input greatly appreciated!!!
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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  3. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

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    Lice are common, no matter how clean things are. It's not a big deal. Don't know about you, but I remember having to get prescription lice treatment as a kid - the whole school had to go on lice patrol with teachers combing through our hair.
    I just got my first batch of chicks last week - 3 different ages. The older ones that are outside had lice and I put diatomaceous earth in their bedding and used some topical ivermectin on the back of their neck that I will repeat in about 10 days.

    Diatomaceous earth can also be used as a dusting and put into the chickens dust bath area besides in the bedding area.

    I would not use rotenone - in some places you must have a special permit to buy and use it. It kills fish and invertebrates if it is in the water. It is not recomended for use in dogs/cats (so I wouldn't want to use it on my chickens),it is known to kill brain cells in lab studies, and there has been some studies linking it to Parkinson's disease.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Unfortunately, ivermectin does not kill lice in chickens. Chicken lice do not suck blood. Ivermectin will kill mites though. DE takes time to kill lice, especially if it's an infestation. It's best to get rid of external parasites as soon as possible. Sevin dust will immediately kill lice.
     
  5. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

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    Actually, new research is finding ivermectin useful for lice. A recent article by a poultry vet found it useful for both red mites and lice topically in chickens. It is also used orally. It is also been found to be useful in people lice, including drug resistant lice.

    The other insecticides that many people choose to use, we prefer to stay away from as much as possible due to the toxic effects.

    (from a registered nurse married to a veterinarian)
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Since ivermectin is absorbed through skin into the bloodstream, and chicken lice do not suck blood, there is no way the lice can be killed on a chicken. Keep in mind that ivermectin's primary purpose is used as a wormer in cattle. Its secondary benefit is a MITEacide in both cattle and chickens. Additionally, cattle lice (different type in cattle) DO suck blood. Cattle lice cant live on chickens and visa-versa. Here's a link:
    http://ohioline.osu.edu/vme-fact/0018.html
     
  7. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

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    There is always a lot of conflicting information out there. I see it every day when I read human and animal medical articles.

    We will have to agree to disagree and everyone makes their own choice on how they care for their chickens.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    I agree with you. I've had plenty experience with ivermectin and many other products dealing with external and internal parasites. I only recommennd what I know works best for chickens.
    Here's another link for future reference identifying external parasites on chickens:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ig140
     
  9. CountryCentinel

    CountryCentinel Out Of The Brooder

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    Would DE - Diatomaceous Earth work?
     
  10. WooingWyandotte

    WooingWyandotte Overrun With Chickens

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    I've done a few experiments with DE and what sort of lice it works on. For the yellow, rounder/smaller lice it clears it up in a day (seriously), though I usually do a follow up for awhile. For the longer, segmented/brown lice, DE does nothing. Nothing at all. It doesn't matter how many times I dust the bird, they never go away.
    So for those birds, I'm planning on buying something stronger like Sevin maybe.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012

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