UGH.. too close

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by jdywntr, Mar 7, 2013.

  1. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So my landlord calls about 2.5 hours after full dark here. They live about a mile away and he asks "is everything okay there? I'm outside and I hear coyotes and they're coming from there." I thanked him and said I'd check.

    Outside I went with a flashlight, 5.5 month old Grt Pyr and 9mm gun. We went out quietly and I was shining the light around for a few minutes. Then I see a shape and eyes shining in the light just inside the pasture running away from the coop. I shot 2 rounds at it, though I'm not a great shot and it was dark. Whatever it was (looked like a dog for sure probably coyote). I scared our poor pyr pup. He didn't run away but I don't know if he was nervous because of the gunshot or the smell. Poor little guy. We had a long discussion about how brave he was and that he can't be a wuss. LOL

    This is the closest I've seen them to the coop. Tomorrow morning we'll be making the rounds in the pasture to spread dog scent. Its been a little while since we've been out.
     
  2. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    buy hin a spiked fighting collar, it will give him an edge if he ever gets into a tussle with a whole pack of coyotes and that is what you want him for.

    A fellow I knew out west had a big working ranch. He patrolled the fences on horse back with a cow dog, an Aussie or blue heeler I think it was in tow. He told me that the coyotes had got smart and bold enough to send in a bit*h dog who stayed just out of gun shot range and whose job it was to lure his male dog away from his side and if he didn't keep his eyes open a whole pack of coyotes would fall on his cow dog and try to make dog burger out of it. On time he said that had to ride up like John Wayne and wade into the mob of howling snapping varmits on foot, kicking, screaming, and swinging a big pair of fencing pliers just to rescue his dog from the coyotes. A Gt Py with his full growth under his belt however should be able to take care of business, the spiked fighting collar just makes his job easier and gives you some peace of mind.

    I am just up the road from you. if you ever need to learn how to pinch a coyote's toes, let me know.
     
  3. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: It's really quite dangerous to be shooting at a moving target, in the dark, holding a flashlight, and not being SURE what you're even shooting at.

    If your Pyr is a house dog, he's not going to be much help either.

    I'd suggest an electric fence
     
  4. DianaMallory

    DianaMallory Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A great pyr is a breed of dog that may not be good for guarding. I am not sure about their history, but everyone I have met seems to be to loving to be very good at guarding other than their intimidating size. Coyotes look for easy pray. They usually don't stick around to dig under fences. They want to get the food and move on out of site. If you free range your birds and don't lock them up at night you will lose your flock. If you have them safe from night time predators you shouldn't have to worry. I suggest you buy a shot gun, a coyote call and better lighting. I have a motion light pointed at my coop. which has been on a lot this week. I have caught 1 coon, and one opossum this past few nights. Yes it is spring in predator ville! When I hear the coyotes I wish I had a few pit bulls! Not because of their reputation for fighting because of the jaw pressure they have I feel they could stand up to a pack of coyotes! I have a killer maltese, well he thinks so anyway. I keep telling him that those predators will eat him but he doesn't believe me. I have a fenced in area that my maltys go out in to go potty and even then I go out with them at night. Oh back to my point a shot gun you don't have to be a very good shot with. Just point it in the direction of your target and you will probably hit it. loaded with buck shot not deer slugs.
     
  5. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the comments.

    While it was dark out, I am very aware of my surroundings and the area that I fired into is the lowest point in the pasture so bullets would not go anywhere other than the ground.

    I did alot of research and I know that there are varying opinions on how to raise a LGD. I am raising him inside, for now. He is only 5 months old so to put him outside alone would just be stupid in my opinion. He spends most of the day outside, his choice. He comes from working lines and is not fond of other dogs coming over (my landlord's pyr comes by occasionally). I don't think a dog needs to vicious to people to be a good guardian. I do plan on getting another dog once the pyr is a little older. A companion for him to help with guard duty. I don't plan on getting another Pyr.

    I will be looking into motion sensor lighting for the coop. I'm not worried about a coyote getting in there, I just don't like them coming around.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. homesteadlizzy

    homesteadlizzy Out Of The Brooder

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    We have coyotes at my mom's farm and to be honest, everywhere in the hills...There are a couple of dens in the corner of the woods and at night during bow season you can hear them howl that creepy howl before they come down on the wounded deer that hunters let get away...The only thing that keeps the chickens safe is outdoor motion-activated lighting set up around the barn yard area and three dogs. It is better to have multiple LGD s when you are looking at a pack of coyotes.. a single animal is prey if they get surrounded. More than one dog is better protection not only for the flock, but also for the dogs themselves.
     
  7. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    use a good rifle and a varmint light of some sort to dispatch the pests more accurately, it takes care of a problem and is a fun and challenging hunt. Also a 12 guage shotgun and a 3" 4buck shell will reach out quite a ways and does a good job of killing coyotes.
     
  8. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: I'm pretty sure none of them say they should be inside.
    They can't learn to do the job if they aren't there to do it.

    Quote: .A Pyr is not supposed to be friendly to other dogs, and really not so much to other people.
    It's the entire point of having them.
    If you want another dog, you should either get it now, while the Pyr is still younger, or really rethink the whole reason for having an LGD breed

    They don't make good "yard dogs"
     
  9. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Actually a number of people say raising them inside is fine. Read this info, not about Pyrs but still. http://www.backyardherds.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=23557 There are a number of people on BYC that raised their first LGDs inside. An 8 week old puppy isn't going to be able to do it's job anyway and throwing a puppy outside isn't going to teach it it's job.

    I know that a Pyr isn't supposed to be friendly to other dogs. They are supposed to be reserved with strangers, not aggressive. Most people with multiple LGDs think that it is easier to have a mature dog help "train" a new pup rather than have 2 puppies at the same time.

    I am raising my Pyr to be a flock guardian. He does chores with me and is not left with the birds unsupervised as he is a puppy. He will not be left alone unsupervised with them until he is 1.5-2 yrs as that is what I have found in my research works best. You are entitled to your opinion but it is just that, your opinion.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
    2 people like this.
  10. wahmommy

    wahmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We live in the suburbs of Los Angeles near the WUI (Wildlife Urban Interface-where there is open pockets of wildland and lots of homes right next to it) and coyotes have taken to preying on the neighborhood dogs for supper. This is exactly what they do, they get a female in heat to lure the dog away from the yard or even owner who is walking it, then several coyotes ambush it. This is how they get the medium to larger size dogs (the smaller dogs and cats they just jump over fences and grab by the neck)
     

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