Umm Addicted to the light... :/ ?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Tripp16, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. Tripp16

    Tripp16 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2011
    North Carolina
    Hi everyone so I think I messed up.... It has been really cold here down in the 40s and high 30s so I have had a heat lamp on my 4 wyandotte chicks they are now a little older then a month and they I cant take the light away.

    How do I get them to go without it. They are almost fully feathered (a few baby feathers on their bottoms..) What do you guys think? They look sooo funny being that big in a brooder!! [​IMG]
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Turn it off.
    The earlier weaned the better they can handle winter.
    If using a lamp in an enclosure I would elevate it an inch or so each day at that age.
    I had a 2 week old chick spend the night out alone at 36 degrees with no ill effects. I do have hearty birds but coddling doesn't make them more hardy.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2011
  3. kari_dawn

    kari_dawn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had this problem with mine when they were week olds...I switched to a ceramic heat emitter (no light), and when it was bed time, I turned on the floor lamp, turned off the celing lights, and then eventually the floor lamp...they screamed about it for a while, but they got over it. I try to get them off of being heated as quickly as possible. The faster they are outside, the better for me...brooder babies smell.


    I would take the heat away, and just watch them. They are probably okay.
     
  4. Tripp16

    Tripp16 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2011
    North Carolina
    Quote:Well mine are outside in their brooder. Should I cut it off completely and not wean them off slowly? [​IMG]
     
  5. kari_dawn

    kari_dawn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I say cut it off, and keep an eye on them. Watch their body language, and monitor their stress level. My Chicks just turned five weeks, and I tossed them outside into the big-girl pen right before a cold snap (not planned that way!), and they are doing just fine.

    [​IMG]

    edit-that big fluffy butt sticking out in the corner is NOT one of the babies...she just thought the straw in the baby pen was WAY better than the same straw on the other side...[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2011
  6. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Typically they will cheep all night the first night, then give up the next, or soon after. If it's convenient, you could switch to a small night light for a night or two, then turn it off. They will rest better in darkness and need to adjust.
     
  7. Tripp16

    Tripp16 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2011
    North Carolina
    Quote:Mine look just like these. Epescially the wyandotte chicks. Or at least thats what they look like to me since mine look exactly the same! [​IMG]

    So you have your with your big hens at this age?? [​IMG]
     
  8. kari_dawn

    kari_dawn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yep. put them out about a week ago. I take plastic hardware cloth, those green garden stakes, and cinder blocks and make a pen within my run. Usually, I put a top on it for at least the first few days until I know my big girls won't hurt them (a tarp cut to size works very well), but I couldn't find the top this time, so I just had to watch them really carefully. My chicken run is right outside my kitchen window (almost), so I just opened the window, and listened for any sounds of distress.

    At first all the big girls took turns jumping into the baby pen to scratch around in the straw, but they lost interest quickly enough, and stay on their side of the fence pretty well. Now, the babies are getting brave, and occasionally venturing over the top of their pen; but the birds are all getting along pretty well (well, just look at the picture [​IMG]), so I just put the babies back in if they happen to get out. The cinder blocks keep them from going under the hardware cloth, and a baby gate acts as a door. I have a dog carrier in with the babies, incase the big girls do come into the baby pen and scare the little ones. It gives them somewhere to hide. I also have hiding spots in the big girl's run, just in case a baby gets out, and needs to get away from the big girls.

    The little ones will continue to grow out in the baby run until they are closer to the size of the big girls, and then I will take down the baby pen. This not only allows my birds to get accustom to eachother, but it also gives the babies a chance to get large enough to fend for themselves against the big girls, and grow too large to slip through any part of the pen, while ALSO teaching them where the coop is, and where they are to return to roost in the evenings.
     
  9. Tripp16

    Tripp16 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2011
    North Carolina
    Quote:Wow your big girls must be really well behaved! If I allowed them to go in with my chicks they would terrorize them. I guess every flock is different. I will do this once they get a bit bigger. Thanks soo much for the info! [​IMG]
     
  10. kari_dawn

    kari_dawn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    like I said, I ususally have a top on the thing. If you get 1/2 inch hardware cloth, or just find a nice big cage that the big girls can't reach through, I have found that this works super well for introductions. Things go much smoother (for my flock anyway), if the new intros start out smaller than the big girls, in a big safe area that the big girls can't get into and wreak havok. It makes the neewbs less scared, and it is a very passive way to integrate everyone.

    I also try to time new arrivals to be old enough to go outside right before the older ones hit POL, they tend to be less inclined to peck the little ones at that age.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2011

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