Universal Feed

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Blue_Myst, Apr 4, 2009.

  1. Blue_Myst

    Blue_Myst Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2009
    I'm really stuck on this. I have a flock of hens right now, but soon will include a rooster and three-month old chickens. Is there a kind of universal feed I can give them all? The hens will always have a constant supply of oyster shell, of course.

    If possible, I'd love to have a feed as described above that is organic/semi-organic, but, I'll definitely take what I can get.

    Thanks!
     
  2. mistylady

    mistylady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    All of mine ate layer feed - Kent brand or Dumoor (spelled wrong probably). Now they are all adults and eat anything they can catch plus layer feed! The roos are fine. I asked the guy at the feed store if layer feed would make them crow in a female pitch and want to wear high heels and he said no! So far ... no heels! [​IMG]
     
  3. mistylady

    mistylady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh and you're gonna want some grit too. I use chick grit and they fluff in it in the winter when they can't get to dirt outside.
     
  4. keljonma

    keljonma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 12, 2007
    8A East Texas
    Purina Flock Raiser can be used for all ages. Just provide oyster shell separately for the laying hens.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2009
  5. Blue_Myst

    Blue_Myst Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2009
    Thank you for the replies [​IMG] Roosters and hens can both eat the layer feed? That's a good thing to know!

    Purina Flock Raiser

    I've looked at this, and it sounds great for all-around flock, but it says, quote: 'from hatch until laying age (18-20 weeks)'. I think it also has a 20% protein content instead of the 16% from the Layena. Isn't this too high? [​IMG] I'm not trying to offend you or anything (you know a lot more than I do about this) just curious.​
     
  6. digitS'

    digitS' Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not real knowledgeable about FlockRaiser. Purina made a MeatBuilder until a few years ago and I used that then switched off to Layena when they reached laying age. This flock, I stayed with the FlockRaiser and just supply oyster shell. The birds are doing well on it, laying, and they like it.

    FlockRaiser would probably be a reasonable choice not only for people with mixed species but for mixed ages. I like the fact that it has 20% protein so that I can give the birds things from the kitchen and garden without worrying much about diluting the protein content of their diet.

    Most veggies and "treats" are low-protein foods. With a 14% protein layer feed, you could easily reduce the total protein down to where they just aren't getting the 20 grams, or so, that would be a minimum needed.

    Steve
     
  7. keljonma

    keljonma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 12, 2007
    8A East Texas
    Also, to add to what digitS' said, we find the extra protein helps when they birds are molting. The majority of our flock have been laying for 2 years or more and they do well on FlockRaiser.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2009
  8. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    For years all I fed was a 22% protein game bird grower crumble. I fed it from the day they hatched 'till the day they died. This year, I went back to a 16% layer [Purina} in an attempt to save a few bucks. Production has been terrible! By this time last year,with the same number of hens, I had hatched over 400 chicks. This year so far I have less than 100. Fertility & hatchability are fine but they just aren't laying well.
    Needles to say I have gone back to the higher protein feed & production is starting to pick up.
     
  9. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    With all I have learned over the past 2 years about diet in nutrition in humans, cats and zoo animals, I would err on the side of higher protein, not lower when it came to critters.

    Zoos found out the hard way they were seriously underestimating the protein needs of their animals. When they upped protein, animals they once believe could not be bred in captivity suddenly started reproducing.
     
  10. The Chicken Lady

    The Chicken Lady Moderator Staff Member

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    That's really interesting about the zoos, Wifezilla. I learn something new on BYC every day! [​IMG]
     

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