Unusual deposit on eggshell Opinions, Please?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by ivan3, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    We have our hermaphroditic hen (the crowing `spurster') and she's laid a total of three eggs in as many years (all three not much bigger than a thumb nail). So, oddities aren't cause to fret (so far).

    Only one BSL girl laid an egg on Wed. Nothing untoward, unusual - just the normal bwaccking and growling (no blood, nothing). The egg appeared to be well within spec. and I didn't give it further thought until Cass asked about an area of `roughness' on the shell. I grabbed a loupe and this is what we observed: Used white LED in second shot to give the `egg' shapes better definition, incandescent on final two shots of a single `egg' for `natural color' - that `hatching' on paper is a solid line on a writing tablet . If you look closely you can see even smaller `egg' shapes `hiding' here and there down between, or attached to. the larger ones.

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    If this is a common deposition found on our `bioceramics' please bring us up to speed. When the flock goes to roost I'll be back and check in (this one has got me stumped). These `concretions'? were attached tightly to the shell itself. After carefully removing via magnifying headset and dental tools - we placed them in vinegar. They dissolved completly (rules out insects/waste/etc) - some oviduct tissue overactive?
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2008
  2. CarriBrown

    CarriBrown Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    That is odd... What does it feel like? Can you scrape it off with your fingernail?
    I get some weird things like that on my eggs sometimes, and I think it is calcium build up.
     
  3. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    All I can say is WOW!!! [​IMG]
     
  4. SpottedCrow

    SpottedCrow Flock Goddess

    Interesting...looks like the calcium/eggshell producing gland had an interesting glitch...
     
  5. eggzettera

    eggzettera Chillin' With My Peeps

    Cool pictures....
     
  6. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    Mine have calcium deposits on them sometimes, but nothing like that little cluster.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2008
  7. bigzio

    bigzio Overrun With Chickens

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    Yep, it is simply excess Vitamin D. These are pimples on the egg shells. If picked they create small holes in the shell. In most cases, it is just the result of a hen that consumes to many oyster shells, or too much cacium added to the feed. This is most common with pullets or younger hens. Once they become older this problem usually disappears.

    bigzio
     
  8. gmc

    gmc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is some weird stuff right there; I don't care who you are. Excellent photography work thou, guess I'm most impressed with your ability to take pictures more than anything.
    [​IMG]

    gmc
     
  9. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Bigzio, know what you're talking about (but the margins on the few we've found that way were ragged and the shapes were indefinite - did indeed leave membrane exposed when picked off), but this set of `ovoids' were `cemented' to only the surface and, after scraping, just hard enough, ALL came away - some of the tiny ones stayed attached to larger ones). ALL were ovoidal solids, i.e., looked just like tiny hen eggs (that's why I posted). Shell, integrity, was not compromised; just rough with the calcium carb? cement? CB: Solid and difficult to crush. Oh, the hens will all be three yr.s old next month; same old diet same old run, etc.

    I was hoping. Was with you right up until `scabbaceous'(sp?) quality (rip shell when removed). Anyway, if you have a shot of some eggs so affected (or link to shots) would appreciate it (would like to compare).

    Spotted Crow Yes, maybe a `gland'/sloughed tissue, etc. I could only find the abstract of a journal article (but now have an entry point into the the jungle of footnotes/`bibs'). Alreadly preparing to use the synonym for eggs: composite bioceramic, e.g., `Officer, that ****** dog of our neighbor's threatened the continued fabrication of our composite bioceramics!! If this occurs again it is imperative that we are contacted immediately by both the APHIS division of the DOA, and the Dept. of Homeland Security. It is obvious that these traitors are threatening this nation's food supply!!....

    gmc Thanks, but anyone with a tripod/10x Loupe/camera (a heavily used C. Powershot A530)/a superbrite LED flashlight/60w soft white in desklamp) can do better (I was rushing to snap that half-focused anomaly - and pack it in before the roo started calling me to morning prayer...). Improvise and shoot everything all the time! Take Care [​IMG]

    THE ABSTRACT (for other interested aficianados):

    Secretion pattern, ultrastructural localization and function of extracellular matrix molecules involved in eggshell formation

    Maria Soledad Fernandez, , Alejandra Moya, Luis Lopez and Jose Luis Arias
    Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Universidad de Chile and Center for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research in Materials (CIMA), Santiago, Chile
    Received 10 April 2000; revised 26 September 2000; accepted 18 October 2000. Available online 19 February 2001.

    Abstract
    The chicken eggshell is a composite bioceramic containing organic and inorganic phases. The organic phase contains, among other constituents, type X collagen and proteoglycans (mammillan, a keratan sulfate proteoglycan, and ovoglycan, a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan), whose localization depends on a topographically defined and temporally regulated deposition. Although the distribution of these macromolecules in the eggshell has been well established, little is known about their precise localization within eggshell substructures and oviduct cells or their pattern of production and function during eggshell formation. By using immunofluorescent and immuno-ultrastructural analyses, we examined the distribution of these macromolecules in oviduct cells at different post-oviposition times. To understand the role of proteoglycan sulfation on eggshell formation, we studied the effects of inhibition of proteoglycan sulfation by treatment with sodium chlorate. We showed that these macromolecules are produced by particular oviduct cell populations and at precise post-oviposition times. Based on the precise ultrastructural localization of these macromolecules in eggshell substructures, the timing of the secretion of these macromolecules by oviduct cells and the effects on eggshell formation caused by the inhibition of proteoglycan sulfation, the putative role of mammillan is in the nucleation of the first calcite crystals, while that of ovoglycan is to regulate the growth and orientation of the later forming crystals of the chicken eggshell.

    Author Keywords: Eggshell; Oviduct; Biomineralization; Type X collagen; Keratan sulfate; Dermatan sulfate; Mammillan; Ovoglycan

    Corresponding author. Tel.: +56-2-678-5550; fax: +56-2-541-6840; email: [email protected]

    Matrix Biology
    Volume 19, Issue 8, January 2001, Pages 793-803

    ed:sp
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2010
  10. bigzio

    bigzio Overrun With Chickens

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    ivan3, this is indeed is common with hens that consume to many oyster shells/egg shells. I'm sure this is consistant with a paticular hen. If you were to isolate her from the rest of the flock, take away the oyster shells ( vitamin D ), the pimples will go away. While I would bet this is a pullet, it will clear up on it's own. I've been through this already.
    The best reference book every poultry owner should own is" The Chicken Health Handbook" by Gail Damerow.Well Worth the $20.00.

    bigzio
     

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