UPDATE 9/29: Coccidia

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by pawsplus, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. pawsplus

    pawsplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My 2 new girls, who are 8-9 weeks old now, just came home last weekend. They seem very healthy, and have normal feces. I took a fecal sample to the vet and they are positive for coccidia. The vet recommended that I get, from the Co-op, either something called OTC or amprolium & sulfa.

    Is one better than the other? What does treatment entail?

    The girls are in quarantine from my other 2 chickens and will be until they have a clear fecal. Just looking for advice or suggestions!

    Also, should I be at all worried? It's not horribly difficult to clear up, is it? The girls came from a friend of mine who has a lot of chickens. She keeps them well--certainly not to my standards, but mine are pets. They are kept clean and her hubandry seems sound. Is it pretty 'normal' that they would have it?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2011
  2. Chick Norris

    Chick Norris Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What prompted you to take a sample to the vet?

    If they are perfectly healthy, they most likely have already built up a tolerance to the coccidia. The drugs like Amprolium only keep the coccidia in check until the chick has long enough to build up a good natural tolerance.

    So to sum up, they are probably fine as is but Amprolium will not hurt at all if you really want peace of mind. We fed ours chick starter with Amprolium for the first six weeks.

    As a disclaimer, I am not a vet and would never claim to be able to better advise you than your vet. This is just my opinion.
     
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:I dont know why the vet would recommend oxytetracycline (OTC.) Maybe he meant "Over The Counter" amprolium or sulmet. In any case, I recommend the amprolium (Corid.) It will be in the cattle section at your Co-op. You can use the 9.6% oral solution or the 20% soluable powder. I dont recommend using sulmet, it is more harsh on their systems and only kills 2 types of cocci. Corid/amprolium kills all 9 types.
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Quote:I dont know why the vet would recommend oxytetracycline (OTC.) Maybe he meant "Over The Counter" amprolium or sulmet. In any case, I recommend the amprolium (Corid.) It will be in the cattle section at your Co-op. You can use the 9.6% oral solution or the 20% soluable powder. I dont recommend using sulmet, it is more harsh on their systems and only kills 2 types of cocci. Corid/amprolium kills all 9 types.

    I agree with Jim 100%.
     
  5. pawsplus

    pawsplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OK -- I got the amprolium this a.m.

    What prompted me to take a sample to the vet is that they are new chickens, they are in quarantine, and the whole POINT of q-tine is to make sure there is nothing wrong w/ the new ones so they don't give something to my current girls!

    Are you guys saying I shouldn't even treat them? That I will be unable to get a clean fecal sample and shouldn't even try? Or what?

    My plan was to do the 5-day treatment on the package and then retest in a few weeks.

    The package is for cows so it's going to seriously challenge my math skills figuring out the correct amount to use in 1 gallon instead of 50 gallons, LOL (esp. as I have no idea how I'm going to know what 1/8 of an oz measures as --any suggestions????).

    Thanks!
     
  6. Oobhakeb

    Oobhakeb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:SOMEONE TOLD ME A TABLESPOON PER GALLON SO THATS WHAT I USED
     
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:Good job, glad you got the corid. Dosage for the 20% soluable powder is 1/2 teaspoon per gallon of water. Mix the corid daily with fresh drinking water for 5 consecutive days. There is no withdrawal.
     
  8. pawsplus

    pawsplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    THANK YOU!! I couldn't figure out the ounces to tsp. thing, LOL.

    No need for "withdrawal." These are beloved PETS!!! [​IMG]
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    I'm not a vet, so keep that in mind. And I'm not going to even talk about danger to the new birds. I think your danger is to the existing flock, at least from that specific variety of Cocci protozoa. I'll address it from my viewpoint and wlecome any other's opinions or comments. Please correct me where I am wrong.

    Coccidiosis is caused by a proptozoa that can live in the chickens intestimes. As others mentoned, chickens develop an immunity to specific varieties of the protozoa. But immunity to one variety does not give immunity to all the different varieties.

    Some protozoa in ther systems is not a big deal. It's when the number of protozoa get large that it causes problems. Cocci protozoa can also thrive in wet manure, so a dry coop and run help reduce the risk of them building up in numbers high enough to cause harm.

    Amprolium does not kill the protozoa when given in small doses, like in medicated feed. It inhibits But Corid is much stronger than the Amprolium in medicated feed. I think Corid is strong enough that it will kill them. I'm not sure but I think it is given in high enoigh doses that it will eventually cause the protozoa to actually die. Make sure that Amprolium you got is mixed in treatment strength, not prevention strength.

    The new chickens almost certainly have an immunity to the cocci protozoa the are carrying. Your existing flock may or may not have that immunity. I don't know what varieties of cocci protozoa you have lining in your ground. It could very easily be the same as your friend. If your existing chickens are immune, you have no problem. But older chickens are more likely to suffer from cocci than really young chickens, so there is danger to your chickens, I just don't know how much.

    I'd suggest you continue with the treatment of the two new chickens. I see Dawg53 gve you the dosage. You are not really treating them. They have immunity and are fine. You are trying to clear out all the protozoa so they can't give it to your existing chickens.

    But when you do add these two to your existing flock, observe them for a couple of weeks pretty closely. There is a pretty good chance they will be fine, either you wiped it out with your treatment, they are already immune to that strain, or the numbers just don't get high enough to cause a problem while they develop that immunity. Try to keep the coop and run dry so the numbers don't build up in wet manure. But just be prepared to treat if you see a need. If you are looking for it and catch any problems before it becomes severe, you should be able to handle it. And I have a feeling you will be watching closely.

    Good luck and enjoy those new birds.
     
  10. pawsplus

    pawsplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What about putting them ALL ("old" chickens and new ones) on a preventative dose when I put them together in 3-4 weeks? There is a 21 day preventative dose listed on the packet along w/ the 5-day treatment dosage.
     

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