UPDATE: Full Tutorial with Lots of Pics! -- Made some killing cones

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Winsor Woods, Sep 14, 2009.

  1. Winsor Woods

    Winsor Woods Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Cascade Range in WA
    So I was digging through the garage today and what to my wondering eyes did appear? A half used roll of 12" flashing. I had seen some plans for making some killing cones out of 16" flashing and thought I would make the calculations for making a similar cone out of 12" flashing.

    So for all you're curious minds out there, here is the rough dimensions to cut 12 inch flashing to make a killing cone that is an analog of the 16" flashing version.

    Cut a 30" sheet of flashing. on one edge of the flashing measure 15" to find the midpoint. From your midpoint mark, measure back towards the ends 8.5 inches. Do this from each side of the midpoint mark. Now strike a line from these latest marks to the corners on the opposite side of the flashing. Then use tin snips to cut along these two lings and then roll up and overlap the free ends by 1 inch on the top and bottom. Use clamps to hold the flashing in this position and then drill 4 sets of holes, evenly spaces along the portion where the flashing intersects. Then use rivets to secure the cone together. (You can use bolts as well, but make sure that you put the bolt/rivet through from the inside so that the bird won't get cut when you put him in the cone.

    After I made them, I grabbed a 6.5 week old Cornish X by the legs and did a test fit. It was perfect! I was a little worried about the cone being too short because I was using 12" flashing instead of 16" flashing. As it was, I had to read down into the cone to get the legs of the bird to pull it out. I think I'd be more apt to cut my arm on the top edge of the cone if I had used the 16" flashing. I don't see needing flashing any wider than 12" with a chicken but perhaps the 16" flashing would be a better dual purpose cone if you are processing turkeys as well.

    Dan

    Edit: Ok, I was out making another killing cone today and taking step by step pictures. Tutorial to follow shortly. I did, however, realize that I was using 14" flashing and not the 12" flashing as I previously stated. Sorry for any confusion that might cause but even so, you'll see when I post the tutorial that 12" flashing will be more than adequate. In fact, I wish I had found 12" flashing but I wasn't going to buy some when I already had the 14" on hand. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2009
  2. FarmerRob

    FarmerRob Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Georgia
    Sounds great! So how about a couple of pics of the process/layout and the finished product????
     
  3. Winsor Woods

    Winsor Woods Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Cascade Range in WA
    Here is the Killing Cone Construction Tutorial

    First of all here's everything that you'll need.
    [​IMG]

    Safety gear:
    -face shield
    -gloves
    -bucket to hold sharp metal scraps.

    Tools:
    -at least 2 clamps
    -tin snips
    -drill with 3/16 metal cutting bit (or other appropriate sized bits for your particular rivets or bolts)
    -tape measure
    -pencil
    -straight edge (not pictured but I just used a 3' section of 2x4
    -Rivet gun (or wrenches/sockets if you are using bolts)
    -a good clamping surface (not pictured in this first photo. I just used a
    board held up by saw horses)

    Supplies:
    -14" Flashing
    -3/16" aluminum Rivets
    -Rivet backers for 3/16" rivets

    Ok, before we go any further, lets talk about safety with flashing. Flashing is wickedly sharp and will easily slice you to the bone. I've been cut by flashing before and it's no fun. I was cut so badly that I could see cartilage and bone. I was even wearing gloves when I got cut so now I wear two pair of gloves. A thin, rubber coated under pair of gloves with thick leather work gloves over the top of them. In the following photos, you'll see my gloved hands with just the thin rubbery gloves. That's only because I had stopped working to take the photos and it was easier to operate the camera by taking the thick leather gloves off. I always worked with both pair of gloves on my hands, otherwise.

    When cutting the flashing try to make a clean cut without sharp jagged edges. In the following picture, the diagonal cut along the top is nice and smooth but the cut along the bottom has lots of jagged edges just waiting to stab you.
    [​IMG]

    Secondly, a roll of flashing is under lots of pressure and strain as you unroll it. It has a memory like and elephant and will spring back to it's rolled up position in a split second. If you are in the way when that happens, you'll be heading for the ER. For this reason, CLAMPS are you're best friend. In addition to the gloves, wear a full face shield. I've got a few dings in my face shield from flashing. You don't need to lose any eyes or ding up your pretty faces. Before you unroll the flashing, clamp one end of it to a secure place like a workbench or board. Then unroll the flashing and clamp again. This way you won't have the flashing roll up on you while you're working.

    Here's what I mean:
    [​IMG]

    The clamp on the left was secured first BEFORE I unrolled the flashing. Then the clamp on the right was secured to hold the desired amount of flashing flat.

    Next, measure out 30" of flashing. Using a straight edge, strike a line at this position.
    [​IMG]

    Now find the midpoint by measuring 15" from one end and marking the midpoint.
    [​IMG]
    Now, using the midpoint as a reference mark, measure back towards each end 8.5":
    Here's the mark to the left of the midpoint:
    [​IMG]
    Here's the mark to the right of the midpoint:
    [​IMG]

    Ok, before we go any further, lets cut the flashing along the first line you scored at the 30" mark:
    [​IMG]

    Now we have two more lines to score. Start from one of the marks you made at 8.5" from the midpoint. Draw a line diagonally towards the nearest corner on the other edge of the flashing: (note that these pictures are taken from the opposite side as the previous pictures)
    [​IMG]
    Repeat this with the other end of the flashing:
    [​IMG]
    Now make sure that you're clamps are on the inside of the lines because you'll be cutting next and you won't get your snips to cut the line unless the flashing is clamped so the line is free from clamp and clamping surface obstructions. In this next picture I need to move my clamp:
    [​IMG]
    Clamp has been moved and I'm free to make my cut:
    [​IMG]

    Now it's time to make our next cut...Cut along one of these diagonal lines:
    [​IMG]

    And then cut along the other diagonal line:
    [​IMG]

    So what you have now is a trapezoid shaped piece of flashing that has has a long 30" edge that will become the top of the cone:
    [​IMG]

    And a 17" edge that will become the bottom of the cone:
    [​IMG]

    CAREFULLY unclamp the flashing one side at a time. The flashing will naturally roll up on itself. Then overlap the two diagonal cuts you made so there is a 1-2 inch overlap on the top. I always start with the top end of the seam because it's easier to see how much overlap you've got because the corners of flashing are sticking out. Loosely clamp this end of the seam. You'll want the clamping pressure tight enough that you can't pull the seam apart, but still loose enough that you can pivot one side of the seam with respect to the other. This will be important in the next step but here's what this top side looks like loosely clamped:
    [​IMG]
    Now you want to adjust the bottom end of the seam so that you have the same amount of overlap. This is why you wanted to be able to pivot the seam on the top end. Once you're happy with the alignment, clamp the bottom end tightly and tighten the clamp at the top end:
    [​IMG]

    Now we're ready to drill holes for the rivets. For this cone I used 4 evenly spaced rivets to secure the seam. Since the clamps are covering the areas at the top and bottom of the seam, I'll start by drilling holes for the rivets in the middle of the seam. Try to drill your holes so that you're right in the middle of the overlapped portion. (Centered left and right versus top to bottom.)

    It's important that the two edges of flashing that overlap to become the seam are held flat with each other and that you've got some good support underneath the seam as you drill the holes. For this I thread a 2x4 board into the clamped cone that will provide support from under the seam.
    [​IMG]

    Drilling the holes:
    [​IMG]

    Here's the two central holes drilled:
    [​IMG]

    Most likely, the holes as viewed from the outside of the cone will be nice and clean looking. Take a few seconds to inspect the holes from the inside. Many times they are full of sharp protrusions and other imperfections. Here's what the two holes I just drilled look like from inside the cone:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Use a file or screwdriver etc. to remove these imperfections. This will allow the rivets to seat properly in their holes and hold the seam together tightly.

    Here's the cleaned out holes:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    For the riveting, you'll need rivets (left) and rivet backers (right). You'll need one of each for each of the four holes that will eventually be secured by rivets.
    [​IMG]

    Now FROM THE INSIDE OF THE CONE test fit one of the rivets. Make sure it sits flush against the flashing like this:
    [​IMG]

    Now check the rivet protruding from the outside of the cone:
    [​IMG]

    Now you know that the rivet will seat nicely, it's time to get the rivet gun. Here's the business end of the rivet gun:
    [​IMG]

    Here the gun with the rivet properly loaded:
    [​IMG]

    With the rivet loaded in the rivet gun, insert the rivet through the hole from the INSIDE of the cone like this:
    [​IMG]

    Now place the rivet backer over the protruding portion of the rivet on the outside of the cone like this:
    [​IMG]

    Hold the rivet and backer steady from the outside and keep the rivet gun held firmly against the flashing from the inside. When you are certain the proper position is achieved, drive the rivet home by squeezing the handles on the rivet gun. YOU ONLY GET ONE SHOT AT THIS SO BE SURE THE RIVET IS PROPERLY SEATED BEFORE AND DURING THIS PROCESS.

    Here's the finished rivet from the inside of the cone. Note how flush and smooth it sits with the flashing. This won't catch on any part of the bird as it's slid into the cone.
    [​IMG]

    Here the same rivet from the outside of the cone. If we had riveted from the outside of the cone, this would be on the inside would catch on the bird when it was put into the cone. The idea is to make this as painless as possible for the bird. We want him to be nice and comfortable so he doesn't complain and will just drift off to death as he bleeds out.
    [​IMG]

    If you don't have a rivet gun, you can use nuts and bolts to secure the seam. I recommend carriage bolts fed through from the inside so you have a smooth and rounded surface that is in contact with the bird.

    Complete the other center rivet just like the first one:
    [​IMG]

    Now unclamp the cone. The two rivets will now hold the cone in the right alignment while you complete the final two rivets:
    [​IMG]

    Next prepare to drill the holes for the rivets at the ends of the seam. Remember to support the seam from underneath!
    [​IMG]

    End holes are drilled:
    [​IMG]

    Holes are cleaned up and ready for rivets:
    [​IMG]

    Then install the rivets just like before:
    [​IMG]

    So were almost done. We just have some cleaning up to so with those sharp corners at the top of the cone that you used to get the right overlap on the seam:
    [​IMG]

    Cut the corners off, leaving a smooth but rounded edge:
    [​IMG]

    Then drill one more hole at the top of the seam so that you can hang your killing cone from a hook, string, or screw it to a wall/post.
    [​IMG]

    Clean up your work area! Pets and livestock can easily be injured from the flashing scraps:
    [​IMG]

    Now let's go grab one of my 7 week old Cornish crosses for a test fit. Shall we!!??

    Here he is. I took the photo next to my size 13 shoe to show you how big he is. He's probably about 6-7 pounds.
    [​IMG]

    Into the cone he goes! (The red area on his leg is just dirt. NOT BLOOD. No chickens were harmed during the making of this tutorial! [​IMG] )
    [​IMG]

    The cone is now hanging on a hook with the bird inside. He's just content to watch me from his new vantage point.
    [​IMG]

    No struggling or complaining. Hanging upsidedown has a calming effect on chickens:
    [​IMG]

    PLENTY of room at the top of the killing cone. between 6-8 inches depending on where I measure:
    [​IMG]

    Just hanging out and enjoying a new perspective on things:
    [​IMG]

    Chicken rotated in cone 180°:
    [​IMG]

    The birds usually pull their legs down towards their body as you can see from this photo. Also note that there is AMPLE room for a larger bird, perhaps even a turkey:
    [​IMG]

    Hope this helps! Enjoy and if you make some killing cones, post some pictures in this thread!

    Dan
     
  4. 3KillerBs

    3KillerBs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 10, 2009
    North Carolina Sandhills
    Excellent tutorial. Thank you.
     
  5. Winsor Woods

    Winsor Woods Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Cascade Range in WA
    Quote:You're very welcome! [​IMG]

    Dan
     
  6. Eggs4Sale

    Eggs4Sale Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 29, 2009
    Very cool!

    Thank you for being ultra-detailed..... It's always the little details that get left out and make it confusing for others trying to repeat it. Nice job!
     
  7. Winsor Woods

    Winsor Woods Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Cascade Range in WA
    Quote:Thanks Eggs4Sale. I was afraid that I was being a little too detailed and that the extra detail would turn people off. Glad you seem to have the opposite reaction. [​IMG]
    Dan
     
  8. comp6512

    comp6512 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 3, 2008
    Wow, that's awesome! Even I (a female) can do it, or at least hope I can.

    How would you adjust the size if I plan on raising/processing DP bird, such as Buff Orpinton?
     
  9. Winsor Woods

    Winsor Woods Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Cascade Range in WA
    Quote:Hi comp6512,

    Thank you so much for you complements! I'm sure you'll have no problems making your own cones. [​IMG]

    I don't know that you'd need any adjustments really. I guess it would really depend on when you are culling your Buff's. If you cull earlier, you might make the small end of the cone a bit smaller. You can see from my photos with the Cornish cross in the cone, that the bird's shoulders are right near the opening. This is why so much of the birds head and neck stick out. The advantage of this is that the bird is snugly wedged in the cone and can't pull his head up into the cone. A thinner bird, like my 16 week old Wyandottes would fall straight through the cone. So if I wanted to cull a smaller bird, what I would do is make the short side of the flashing (the 17" side) about 13-14". If you keep the 30" on the top side of the cone, you'll still be able to use it for larger birds, they'll just get wedged higher up in the cone. As a result, you may have to reach up into the cone for their head. So there's trade offs, but it's a great question! Thanks for asking.

    The other thing you can do is to test fit a bird when you've got the cone clamped but before you drill holes. This way you can adjust the overlap more or less to tweak the diameter of the small end.

    Dan
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2009
  10. hildymarie

    hildymarie Out Of The Brooder

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    da UP of Michigan
    Yes, that was an excellent tutorial. We tried to make one using another description and ended up with a big aluminum funnel. Sorta worked but not really, we thought the monster bird was goig to jump right out of there. This one is great and you make a great teacher. All the details were a great help and imo, necessary. Not everyone is familiar with messing with these materials. We still have some flashing left and might give cones another go of it. Right now we use the wire clothes line and baling twine. One could make a set of these and make the job much quicker and easier. Thanks again.
     

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