******UPDATE POST 18******My chickens are cloudy eyed, snotty nosed

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by FF, Oct 24, 2010.

  1. FF

    FF Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello. I have about chickens that have snotty noses, really cloudy eyes with what looks like little bubbles in their eye tears. They shake their head and snot flies everywhere. Sorry for such graphic discription but that just it. They are acting ok but it all started with one who I though was healed but evendentally wasn't. Shes still sick and now teh rest are sick. PLEASE HELP ME. They are 32 weeks old, no eggs and now they are evendenatally sick. I had 2 chickens that I had before these that had I guess was pneumonia and I gave them each 3 shots of baytril a shot every day for 3 days. Those shots costed me $60 and now I just don't have that kind of money to let loose right now. If there is any kind of medicine out there that is ok for egg layers please let me know. THANK YOU very much for replying. Dusty
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2010
  2. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    They are very sick with some sort of upper respiratory infection. Hurry down to the feed store and get some antibiotics. My recommendation is Lincomycin if you can find it. If not, Tylan soluable powder. Add it to their water in the recommended dose for at least 7 days.
     
  3. FF

    FF Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thank you very much oldtimegator. I appreciate it. Is it caused from bacteria coming in from humans or something else? I just cleaned their coop out yesterday but didn't bleach anything or anything like that. I knew I should have but was hoping it would just be a little cold or something. I have got my rooster with the cloudy eyes here but I need some medicine desperetly. Is it ok to eat the eggs while on this treatment? Thank you again! Dusty
     
  4. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You may want to look up MG, IB, Coryza and CRD.

    Many respritory problems are viral in nature. The antibiotics won't cure them. However the antibiotics can help control seconday infections which go hand in hand.

    http://www.shagbarkbantams.com/ib.htm

    http://www.shagbarkbantams.com/page22.htm

    Unfortunatly to avoid sugar coating the situation many if not most respritory problems are chronic deseases that are with the chicken for life, even if the breakout can be controled the chickens are likely to remain infectious and likely to transmit the virus to new flock members. Also any time the flock is stressed you are likely to have an outbreak.

    It is likely not a good idea to eat eggs while treating with antibiotics as this does pose a risk of initiating or passing an antibiot resistant bug through consumption of the eggs. Some arguments are made and packages read that treatment of a layer with some antibiots means the eggs must never again be eaten. I have been reading a lot of conflicting information on this though and other sources say only a 21 day withdrawal is required.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  5. bikechick

    bikechick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also look up Laryngotracheitis (LT).
    I see your from TN. If one of your sick chickens die or you euthanize one-I recommend you take them to the State Vet (Dept of Agriculture) and they will run test and diagnose the sickness for free. Feel free to PM me if you have anymore questions.
     
  6. MOChickenz

    MOChickenz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mine just had what appeared to be mycoplasma. Symptoms sound pretty similar, but I am not an expert in any way. Gave 800 mcg duramycin in the water for 10 days. I lost one during that period, but it was a sickly chicken to start off with.

    The directions on duramycin call for 400-800 mcg. I went big.

    Good luck.
     
  7. Sterlingc27

    Sterlingc27 Out Of The Brooder

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    I am dealing with something similar to what you have going on. I dearly hope they wont be carriers of something bad but if so i will diligently build a coop in a far corner and keep them safely away from my flock.

    Right now i am treating my birds (3 mille fleure bearded belgian, 4 porcelain Bearded belgian d'uccle) with antibiotic in their water at a rate of 800 units, i agree with going big. And im on day 2 of treatment after losing 2 crele OEG birds over a 2 week period. Ive lost one since we began the antibiotic treatment and the last one was a heart breaker.

    Symptoms i am seeing include the runny nose, puffy eyes, and sneezing/coughing. They seem fine until suddenly they are sleepy and then die. We nearly got one back from the brink but then later it passed. I have a light on the birds as two seem to be very weak and the nights are chilly here.

    I want them to stop dying and i want to know how to determine which birds are infected and which may be carriers. Many of my birds recently came from the same person and may have come with this problem. Most have been isolated by breed and cross contamination since their arrival here is unlikely.

    Any more advice would surely help.
     
  8. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    It could be any of the things already mentioned. If one dies, you definitely need to get a necropsy done within twenty four hours. If one is on it's last legs I would go ahead and take it for a necropsy and just have them euthanize it. Painful for you, but it may save the rest of the flock. And then go from there as to how to treat. Depending on what it is, I would suggest contacting the Chicken doctor at www.firststatevetsupply.com Though not a vet, he is a poultry expert and is cheaper than a vet; he will give you personalized care and sell you the meds you need, too. I know from experience, he saved our flock once, and has "doctored" individual cases for us a few times. There are options which are not as expensive as going to a vet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  9. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    but if so i will diligently build a coop in a far corner and keep them safely away from my flock.

    I don't know if that would be enough.

    One problem is even cloths become a potential vector for the spread, it would mean changing cloths/boots and washing/disinfecting between visiting coups, separate feed and feeders, waterers that never once got mixed up and so on.

    Even then all it would take is a wild bird or maybe even rodent to bridge the gap and infect your other birds.

    It's a tough call, cull, wait a bit and start over or close the flock and accept that you may well have to deal with ongoing breakouts from time to time and any new birds are likely to become infected. Not the end of the world if you are not intending to sell chicks or hatching eggs.

    Seems alot of people are dealing with respritory bugs in their flock right now, time of year I suppose.​
     
  10. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    OK, one more thing. If you have a high mortality rate, chances are it is ILT. This is bad, but...there is a vaccine you can get to give them, even the sick ones, which will help a whole lot, and the vaccinated birds will NOT be carriers. I believe it is a dead vaccine, but again, firststatevetsupply sells it. That is what our flock had and we were able to save them by administering the vaccine. I would strongly recommend working with the Chicken Doctor if you choose to go the vaccine route. Don't just buy it without talking to him. I know our birds are not carriers as we still have a lot of those birds left who were with the sick flock, and have since acquired many new ones over the subsequent years, with no problems, thank God.

    If you have a low mortality rate; birds are sick but not dying, then chances are that it may be coryza or CRD.

    That is what I have read anyway. This is a bad time of year, as migrating birds are carriers of all that stuff.
     

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