Urban crowing

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by shouldbdiving, Nov 22, 2011.

  1. shouldbdiving

    shouldbdiving Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2011
    I seem to have an affinity for choosing chicks or young chickens that grow up to be roosters. Since I am raising them it is sad to have to re-home them. My newest is an awesomely unique showgirl that I was assured was a hen and months later began crowing. My flock, who have a nice coop & run as well as free range, seems to be much better when there is a rooster. This will be the third time that I will have to re-home one of the flock because they started crowing and each time my hens go through what looks like a very stressful period of readjustment. I live in city limits and am not allowed to keep a rooster. What can I do to help my hens and is there anyone that takes roosters (that won't eat them)?
     
  2. BlazeJester

    BlazeJester Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your hens will be fine without a rooster. Mine are 2.5yrs and have never seen one.

    They will squat for you; if you place two fingers (index and middle) on their shoulder blades and grab the base of their tail with the other, press down firmly and shake gently side to side, this mimics mating and they will view you as "their roo". It is a handy situation to have when you need to handle them, as the urge to submit overtakes any urge to run.

    Where are you located? You can try posting your roo for free in the correct "for sale" subforum or post on your state's thread in the "where am i? where are you?" subforum.
     
  3. shouldbdiving

    shouldbdiving Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2011
    Thank you. I will look at the forums/subforums you suggested. I live in Florida, and unfortunately there's an abundance of roosters needing re-homing due to ordinances. Personally, I think my neighbor's dog who barks at all hours is more of a noise issue than a rooster that will crow occasionally, but I didn't write the law. My hens are friendly and won't run away when I try to pick them up, with the exception of the younger one that is now questionable for pullet or cockerel. I will try what you suggested. It makes sense and explains the odd behavior of a few of my hens actually!

    My hens don't get flighty when the rooster is removed, they sit in their run and make the worst noises for days. A few won't even go out. I was hoping that there was something I could do to more easily transition them to life without a rooster.
     
  4. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know what you mean! We had to go through the same thing, twice. I hated parting with our little cockerels because we got so attached to them.
     
  5. shouldbdiving

    shouldbdiving Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2011
    I have done a lot of research but there does not seem to be any guaranteed way to tell if your chick is male or female. In order to save myself from the heartbreak of having to re-home my beloved pets, how can I be sure that I get pullets (other than buying already laying hens)? My flock is a mixed bantam flock - currently 2 silkies, 2 cochins, 1 sultan-frizzled cochin x, 1 failed attempt at a showgirl (looks like a really ugly silky), 1 showgirl ([​IMG] my roo), and 2 that I have no clue but have feathered feet like the rest of the flock. I would love to get another showgirl to replace my Lola. They are fantastically silly looking! I have been told that there is not a way to tell with my silkies and thankfully they both turned out to be hens!!
     
  6. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    You could get breeds that are easy to sex by colour alone. Silkies are very hard to sex until they are older. Barred rocks are easy to distinguish when they are day old by their head spots/leg colour I've heard.
     
  7. shouldbdiving

    shouldbdiving Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2011
    I know, but apparently I don't like to do things the easy way! I live within city limits and need quiet, non-flighty or flying birds. I am partial to the silkies (and their relatives), cochins, brahmas, etc.
     
  8. shouldbdiving

    shouldbdiving Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2011
    Is there anything that would work to make him not crow (I am not asking about surgical procedures - those are dangerous and many inhumane)? If he doesn't crow I can keep him... if he crows, then he needs to be re-homed.
     
  9. Katydid2011

    Katydid2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I've never heard of anything apart from surgical procedures that actually works to prevent a rooster from crowing. Roosters crow. I've had to rehome a few roosters and I typically do so by placing an ad on Craigslist. I take the time to talk about the roosters positive traits. Is he a good forager? Protective of his girls? Gentle with his hens? Good with people? If the answer is "yes", make sure to mention it in the ad and don't give him away. Charging as little as $10 will help ensure that he doesn't end up in a pot.
     
  10. Mattemma

    Mattemma Overrun With Chickens

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    No idea on the hens.They adjust. I got my roo off of craigslist.I actually posted looking for a free roo to keep not eat. Hopefully whoever takes your roos will do the same.All you can do is hope for the best.

    Lol,I was out at 5AM and he was crowing.Not good since we too live in the city.Shoot,the garbage men are out making noise right now too along with the barking dogs. I know I know it does not change the law.
     

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