URGENT!! Help-DOG PUNCTURED 5 BIRDS-WHAT NOW?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by bzmom6, Oct 14, 2010.

  1. bzmom6

    bzmom6 New Egg

    5
    0
    7
    Oct 11, 2010
    Yellow lab got after 5 cornish cross birds at 7 week. Numerous gashes through skin (some larger than 50 sent piece) and one broken wing thru skin. We washed with soap and water, applied Antibiotic cream. Is there any possibility of recovery or should we just butcher them now? Will they even be safe to eat at this point?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

    6,771
    130
    281
    Apr 15, 2009
    They would be safe to eat. When were you planning to process? I would wait until the wounds heal so the skin is pleasing, and for small wounds that should only take a few weeks. Any birds with large wounds I may consider processing them now. Big wounds take a while to heal, take a lot of bodily reserves to heal, and are at risk for infection. You are not going to want to use antibiotics, I assume, so I would process any that look like they could become infected. The carcasses won't be great looking and may be a bit small, but at least they won't go to waste. I'd cut out any damaged areas.

    Sorry for your problems. Good luck.
     
  3. jaimslee4u

    jaimslee4u Chillin' With My Peeps

    450
    0
    119
    Aug 11, 2009
    Maine
    I had a hawk attack last year that took half my flock and greatly injured the other half. Holes in all of them a couple you could actually see the inside & it would fill up with air when it breathed. I treated with peroxide & water mixture, rinsed, then a betadine & water mixture, rinse & slightly patt dry, then apply anitbiotic ointment. You will need to wrap the wing or cut feathers if they get in the way. I re-applied ointment as needed atleast once a day. I also gave them penicillan everyother day to help ward off infection.
    I know the antibitotic thing is a hot topic but I felt the need with it being an animal attack.

    They are going to be in shock so keep them warm, dry, & quiet and give vitamins and extra treats.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by