URGENT HELP NEEDED ON DYING FLOCK!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by will2528, Jan 5, 2014.

  1. will2528

    will2528 New Egg

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    May 17, 2013
    Hi everyone.
    I'm really hoping some of you can help me here ASAP. I got up this morning and checked on my runner ducks and chickens to find One dead duck, one dead chicken and another about to die. They have all seemed fine the last few days, all seemed to be eating fine and drinking plenty of water.
    There are absolutely no visible signs of injury on any of them. The dead chicken looked like it had gone to roost in the boxes as usual but had died in its sleep, the same story with the dead runner duck.
    The dying chicken is very very lethargic, not eating, not drinking, very weak and keeps falling over. Is just stood scrunched down into its own feathers with its wings hanging down onto the floor. There is very little reaction from it when I go over and pick it up and there are no visible signs that I can see of any injuries etc. it's backside area does look very dirty, however I can't be sure if this is from it hardly being able to stand and dragging its blackened on floor as it moves around.
    The rest of my flock seems quite lethargic as well, the food I put down this morning would normally be cleaned up within a few minutes, however over half of it is still sat there nearly 3 hours later.
    I have little or no reason to believe this is poison, as we have no poison on the property.
    I am panicking that this is a disease and I don't know what I should do!
    HELP PLEEEAAASE........
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    How awful! I am so sorry.

    Is it possible someone intentionally poisoned them?

    I would encourage you to contact a vet and try to arrange a necropsy. In the US, this can be arranged through a department of state government or an ag college, usually either free or for a small cost.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Your chickens and ducks could have coccidiosis, but I would worry that they may have botulism. Watch the sick one closely. You said it was dragging it's back end. Botulism starts in the feet and legs, then working upward to the wings, then neck, and breathing center, paralysing the body. Does he have a droopy neck? They get it from eating something in their area--ducks usually from a pond or creek, but chickens also get it. You can do an epsom salt flush or a molasses flush, but I wouldn't want want to do this if they have coccidosis, since it causes diarrhea. Here is some information:
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/19/botulism
    http://www.avianweb.com/botulism.html
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Last edited: Jan 5, 2014
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    X2!

    Here are some labs in the US:
    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/nahln/downloads/all_nahln_lab_list.pdf


    If you decide to treat for coccidiosis the doses are:

    The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid Powder is 1.5 teaspoons
    The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid liquid is 2 teaspoon.


    The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid Powder is 3/4 teaspoon.
    The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid liquid is 1 teaspoon.


    The .006% dose for Corid Powder is 1/3 teaspoon.
    The .006% dose for Corid liquid is 1/2 teaspoon.


    FDA recommendations:
    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/animaldrugsatfda/details.cfm?dn=013-149
    "Chickens
    Indications: For the treatment of coccidiosis.
    Amount: Administer at the 0.012 percent level in drinking water as soon as coccidiosis is diagnosed and continue for 3 to 5 days (in severe outbreaks, give amprolium at the 0.024 percent level); continue with 0.006 percent amprolium-medicated water for an additional 1 to 2 weeks."


    And this link has these instructions:
    http://www.drugs.com/vet/amprol-9-6-solution-can.html
    "Poultry - as Soon As Caecal Coccidiosis Is Diagnosed, Give 0.024% Amprolium In The Drinking Water For 5 To 7 Days. Continue The Treatment With 0.006% Amprolium Medicated Water For An Additional One To Two Weeks. No Other Source Of Drinking Water Should Be Available To The Birds During This Time."


    -Kathy
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Was it unusually cold last night?

    This is a copy and paste of a post I did, just ignore the California specific details unless you live here:

    How to Send a Bird for a Necropsy

    They need the whole bird, refrigerated, not frozen. If you live in CA, there are four labs that do necropsies on poultry (chickens, turkeys, waterfowl) for free. I know that they do out of state necropsies, but I think they charge for those. You could call them and ask what they charge for out of state "backyard poultry". The lab I use is the one in Tulare, CA. If you are in CA, call them and ask for their FedEx account number, it will save a bunch on shipping charges.

    CAHFS
    18830 Road 112
    Tulare, CA 93274-9042
    (559) 688-7543
    (559) 686-4231 (FAX)
    [email protected]



    The other labs are listed here:
    http://www.cahfs.ucdavis.edu/services/lab_locations.cfm


    If it's Friday, unless you want to overnight for Saturday delivery, I would suggest shipping on Monday for Tuesday delivery. What you need to do, if you haven't already done so, is put your bird in your refrigerator, NOT the freezer! Then you need to find a box, line it with styrofoam (I use the 4'x8'x1" stuff from Home Depot. You can also get smaller pieces at an art store like Michael's, but is way more expensive. Click here to see foam options. You'll also need at least one ice pack. Here are some pictures that I took of the last bird that I sent:

    Box lined with foam on four sides and bottom. Seams of foam taped sealed.
    [​IMG]


    Box, sides, bottom and and top.
    [​IMG]


    Frozen ice pack in ziplock baggie.
    [​IMG]


    Brown paper on top of ice pack.
    [​IMG]


    Hen in ziplock baggie on top of brown paper.
    [​IMG]


    Brown paper on top of hen.
    [​IMG]


    Ice pack on top of brown paper.
    [​IMG]


    Lid on top of brown paper.
    [​IMG]

    Inside the box you should also include a submission form in a ziplock baggie. Do not tell anyone at FedEx that you're shipping a dead animal... that seems to really worry them. Just make sure that nothing will leak.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2014
  8. will2528

    will2528 New Egg

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    May 17, 2013
    Hey all.
    Thank you so much for all your help. The chicken that hadn't yet died has worsened since my earlier post. She is now no longer standing, just lying down and occasionally moving her head. After reading all the info you all kindly posted I do believe this could indeed be Botulism, as it seems to fit the symptoms I have seen so far, plus the fact that the coop is under a very large oak tree, hense there has been a lot of leaves rotting on the ground amongst their faeces, I have tried to keep them as clear as possible, but as I live where there are an awful lot of trees it's darn near impossible.
    It was indeed a very cold night last night, however they live inside a solid brick and slate roof old pig pen, with individual timber boxes built inside for each of them, with minimum entrance holes so as to minimise cold getting to them in the night. They also have a large area both on the floor and up of the floor so as they can roost together. So hopefully this should be sufficient to keep them warm and frost free at night.
    I will have to cross my fingers for tonight as no VET is open today for me to get any medication for them.
    This is heartbreaking as they are very much pets rather than livestock and my children love them. Everyone of them was named and most we have had from eggs.
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Botulism is common when there is a fish or animal carcass somewhere on the property on in the water, and when it rots the botulism toxin is in the part that has not been exposed to air. If you have any molasses or dark Karo syrup that contains molasses, you could try to give them the flush. These act as a laxative to get rid of the toxin in the body. I hope none of the other chickens will get sick.
     
  10. will2528

    will2528 New Egg

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    May 17, 2013
    Definitely has not been any carcasses on the property of any description, certainly not in their run. The only decay they have been exposed to recently would be from the autumn leaves. Would this produce the bacteria?
    Just been out again, and I can't get any response from her at all now. She's still alive barely, but is completely floppy. Not opening her eyes, head and limbs are just flopping around as if she is dead.
    Have separated her and put her in a box with plenty of straw to keep her warm. No response to trying to put fluids in her mouth, no swallow response. Only other thing I can do tonight would be to try and tube feed her some sugar tonic water. I don't even have anything available with molasses content :-(
     

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