Urgent! Hen With Bloody Feces, Very Fatigued

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ilovgemi, Dec 17, 2016.

  1. ilovgemi

    ilovgemi Out Of The Brooder

    14
    1
    26
    Nov 11, 2013
    I have a hen hatched back in April of 2015 with some pretty serious symptoms. I noticed a few days back that she was puffed up and putting her head under her wing often and staying secluded from the other hens. Since this is the general code for sickness in poultry concerns were raised but I originally thought that this was just due to the cold weather that comes with living through a Canadian winter.

    Last night I wandered into the coop and noticed she was very weak and her comb had turned purple in colour so I rushed her into my house where she has been staying for the past 24 hours. I mixed some apple cider vinegar into her water as a desperate attempt to aid what I thought was crop stasis but now I am not too sure.
    Her symptoms include:
    -puffed up/ruffled appearance
    -lethargic, not strong enough to be afraid of people or noises
    -unusual half closed eyes
    -excessive head-under-wing position
    -bloody, runny feces with clear patches
    -inability to move (she sits unless someone enters the room)
    -large baggy crop
    -very prominent keel as she is eating but the food does not seem to digest
    -she is eating and drinking which I thought was unusual for a sick bird

    Answers are appreciated as she is getting weaker and I'm getting desperate to help her any way I can but understand that if it comes to it, I must be ready to put her out of her misery if nothing improves.
    Thanks,

    Laura[​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2016
  2. Leihamarie

    Leihamarie Chillin' With My Peeps

    211
    60
    91
    Jul 28, 2016
    San Diego
    The first thing that comes to mind is coccidiosis. It's not just a juvenile illness. I would immediately get her on corid and get a fecal done to confirm and if so, what kind. It's important to confirm what kind so you can tell whether or not you need Corid or a Sulfa drug. I wouldn't wait though for a fecal to start treating w/ Corid since it's the easiest to get.
     
  3. ilovgemi

    ilovgemi Out Of The Brooder

    14
    1
    26
    Nov 11, 2013
    I happen to have some amprolium on hand which I have used during a coccidiosis problem a year back. I am familiar with coccidiosis symptoms and while she does match certain symptoms I don't think that it is the root cause of this hen's problem. In saying this I think it would be wise to put my birds on the amprolium so thanks!

    I happen to have some amprolium on hand which I have used during a coccidiosis problem a year back. I am familiar with coccidiosis symptoms and while she does match certain symptoms I don't think that it is the root cause of this hen's problem. In saying this I think it would be wise to put my birds on the amprolium so thanks!
     
  4. ilovgemi

    ilovgemi Out Of The Brooder

    14
    1
    26
    Nov 11, 2013
    I happen to have some amprolium on hand which I have used during a coccidiosis problem a year back. I am familiar with coccidiosis symptoms and while she does match certain symptoms I don't think that it is the root cause of this hen's problem. In saying this I think it would be wise to put my birds on the amprolium so thanks!
     
  5. MasterOfClucker

    MasterOfClucker Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,353
    401
    191
    Jul 19, 2016
    Iowa
    Bloody poop is a telltale sign of cocci.Unless your talking about intestinal ling.This chicken has cocci.
     
  6. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    9,433
    2,543
    366
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    I would give the Amprolium just in case it is cocci.

    A few questions:
    When was the last time she laid an egg?
    Notice any abnormal egg laying?
    How does her abdomen feel - hard , soft, squish, bloated, fluid filled, etc.
    You mention a baggy crop - does it go down at all? How does her breath smell?
    Has she ever been wormed?
    Any new flock members within the last 30days.

    It's hard to tell about the poop, but does it look like egg matter is mixed in as well?

    It's possible she could have an internal laying/reproductive disorder like Egg Yolk Peritonitis, Ascites, cancer or tumors.
    The comb turning purple can be a sign of not enough oxygen. If she feels bloated, then she may have some type of blockage that is pressing on internal organs and reducing oxygen.
     
  7. ilovgemi

    ilovgemi Out Of The Brooder

    14
    1
    26
    Nov 11, 2013

    I am not 100% certain of the last time she laid an egg as I have a few other hen's who lay identicle eggs but it is safe to say it has been atleast a couple days. Her abdomen is not very shapely as she is quite malnourished due to the fact that her crop seems to fill but not empty. Her crop is very squishy and I can feel individual grains in it. It seems to have lots of fluid in it. I worked my flock about 4-5 months ago and was planning on doing. It again soon (which is now urgent so I will do today.) As far as the new flock members go, I haven't had any new additions in months and it is winter so my birds are inside and therefore not being exposed to wild birds which is why I doubt cocci to be the cause. Since bringing her inside her comb has returned to its original colour, but I am noticing lots of beak clicking and green masses in her poo which is a telltale sign of cancer (not the clicking part.)
    I appreciate any help as I am becoming quite desperate for answers.
     
  8. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

     
  9. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    9,433
    2,543
    366
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    It sounds like she has a slow/sour impacted crop. Any more signs of blood in the poo? The green poo and loss of weight can be a sign of cancer, but it can also indicate not absorbing nutrients like you are seeing.
    All chickens naturally have Cocci in their "gut", they generally build an immunity to what they have been exposed to. When a chicken becomes ill or their immune system is compromised, Cocci can flourish and overload the system.

    Crop issues usually have an underlying cause. Usually worms, cocci overload or possibly and internal laying/reproductive disorder. Essentially inflammation somewhere is "blocking" the passage of food/liquids, this in turn causes the crop to become boggy and yeasty.

    There are several methods that you can use to treat the crop. Most of these are outlined in the 2 articles below. Treating her for worms is a good idea as well.

    @TwoCrows has a very good article on crop issues. Her treatment ingredients are usually easy to find at your local drug store/walmart (maybe in your own medicine cabinet). She outlines how the crop feels in each instance and the best treatment method. I recommend that you read all of it before you treat.
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/impacted-slow-and-sour-crops-prevention-and-treatments

    The chicken chick article uses an epsom salts flush, followed by copper sulfate. Epsom salts you can find at most any store, the copper sulfate you may be able to find at the feed store - I don't know how much $$ it costs, but may be worth looking into.
    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2014/06/chicken-anatomy-crop-impacted-crop-sour.html
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. ilovgemi

    ilovgemi Out Of The Brooder

    14
    1
    26
    Nov 11, 2013
    Thanks you so much for the information! I will be checking out those articles right away, I haven't noticed much blood in her recent poos which I hope is a good sign. I have out the birds on amprollium and I hope these articles help bring me to a conclusion.
    Thanks again,
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by