URGENT PLEASE READ

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by adorable, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    hi there
    I dont know what to think. I wake up this morning at 7 am to find out the power was out IN the middle o f the night some time,. I am on day 20 with my eggs in the bator. But i dont know how long it was out for.NOw at 300 pm. I do have some pipes. But they were like that since this morning. There has been no changes since then. I am getting worried that the hydro being out for so long has something to do with that. I am a mess right now. Do you think they might be died.THere were going to hatch but know they cant because of the temperature.[​IMG]
     
  2. Acre of Blessings

    Acre of Blessings Canning/Sewing Addict

    Apr 3, 2008
    Axton, VA
    Do you have power now? The main thing is for you to calm down so you can think. [​IMG]
     
  3. AussieSharon

    AussieSharon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 18, 2007
    Virginia
    Once they pip it can take up to 24 hours for them to come out. Chances are they are resting and will continue in a few hours.

    if your power is still out you can wrap the bator in a blanket to help keep the heat.
     
  4. arlee453

    arlee453 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 13, 2007
    near Charlotte NC
    If the power was only out for a few hours and the bator was left closed, it is more than likely just fine.

    Pips can take a VERY VERY long time to progress - and even longer if you are watching and waiting!!

    Patience and let us know what happens!
     
  5. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    159
    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    Yes the power is back on. The temperature is back up to normal. But I am not to sure if they are going to make it.Being so close to the end. Is there more of a chance of making . Then in the second week. Or is more fagile at this stage????I am so bummed out being so close and all. You wait this long. THen this happens when you dont even know it.GRRRRR
     
  6. Acre of Blessings

    Acre of Blessings Canning/Sewing Addict

    Apr 3, 2008
    Axton, VA
    Calm Down. It's gonna be O.K. Take one out after a bit and candle it. But let the temps get back up to par for a while.
     
  7. AussieSharon

    AussieSharon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 18, 2007
    Virginia
    Take a deep breath and walk away from the bator. LOL

    If they are pipping and the power was only out for a few hours they should be just fine.
     
  8. asher

    asher Chicken Enabler Extraordinaire

    Jan 26, 2007
    Mountains of NC
    They should be absolutely fine. I had mine out for hours and the hatch was delayed just a tad, but they actually hatched off better than I expected!
     
  9. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    159
    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    Thanks for the fast reply. I nevered open the bator at all. I dont know what the temp was this morning.Because i took it out when i took all the eggs out of turner. It was fine. So i didnt put it back in. I think it is back up to temp . .Because the light just keeps flickering on and off. That tells me that it is up to temp. I think.I have humidity allmost at 60%. I cant get it any higher. Still no movement or anything. My last hatch didnt take this long.
     
  10. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 17, 2008
    Gainesville, Fl.
    If you could get the humidity up a bit higher it would be better. DON'T cover the airvents...this can cause them to suffocate. Add as much water as your 'bator can take.

    And here is an idea of what will happen the next 24 hours:


    HOW THE CHICK EMERGES FROM THE SHELL

    The head of the chick develops at the large end of the egg. Between the 15th and 16th days, the chick orients itself so that its head is near the air cell at the large end of the egg. Not long before the chick is ready to attempt to make its way out of the shell its neck acquires a double bend so that its beak is under its right wing and pointed toward the air cell. About the 19th day the chick thrusts its head forward. Its beak quickly breaks through the inner shell membrane, and the chick's lungs begin to function. Complete breathing by the lungs usually does not occur until the 20th day of incubation.

    Using its egg tooth (a tiny, sharp, horny projection on the end of its beak), the chick pecks at the shell thousands of times. Finally, the young bird pips its way through the shell and begins to breathe air directly from the outside. After the chick has made a hole in the shell, it stops pipping for three to eight hours and rests. During this time, it is acclimating its lungs to the outside atmosphere. After the resting stage is completed, the second stage of pipping begins.

    The chick begins to turn slowly inside the egg. As it turns, usually counter-clockwise, the cutting edge of the chick tooth continues to chip away. In two to five hours, the chick has made about three quarters of a turn inside the egg. As the chick progresses in its movement around the shell, it begins pushing on the egg cap (large end). Squirming and struggling, the chick works feverishly for about 40 minutes pushing at the cap. Finally with a vigorous shove, the chick breaks free from the shell, still wet and panting.

    When the chick is freed completely from the shell, it lies still. Its energy has been virtually exhausted, and it is extremely tired. After a rest of some few minutes, the chick begins to rise to its feet and gain coordination of its muscles. Within a few days the egg tooth, its usefulness over, will disappear.

    http://chickscope.beckman.uiuc.edu/reso … dures.html
     

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