Urgent: rabbit eye bulging, tissue, discharge

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Dutchgirl, Aug 7, 2013.

  1. Dutchgirl

    Dutchgirl Not Dutch!

    Apr 1, 2008
    U.S.A.
    One of my does has had a very small appetite for a while. Just a few minutes ago I checked on the rabbits. Her left eye was bulging out, with what looked like tissue with blood vessels appearing at the lower corner of the eye. There is white discharge along the lower rim of her eye. Her head is tilted on that side and she is leaning her head against the cage on that side.

    The chickens have access to the cage and could have pecked the eye. It's possible it got scratched by wire. Sickness is, as always, a possibility. Earlier today I'm pretty sure she was fine.

    Please tell me what to do! The feed store is open for another hour.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2013
  2. Dutchgirl

    Dutchgirl Not Dutch!

    Apr 1, 2008
    U.S.A.
    We can go and see if we can get antibiotics at the feed store if needed, but they close in half an hour!
     
  3. Dutchgirl

    Dutchgirl Not Dutch!

    Apr 1, 2008
    U.S.A.
    Don't think it's myxamatosis because I haven't seen other lumps. Was looking at her just on Saturday and everything seemed fine - that is, besides her appetite.
     
  4. Dutchgirl

    Dutchgirl Not Dutch!

    Apr 1, 2008
    U.S.A.
    Does anybody know? Would applying antibiotic ointment help? I know I did this to a duck whose eye was infected but I'm not sure it would work on a rabbit. That's all we have right now.
     
  5. ChocolateMouse

    ChocolateMouse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 29, 2013
    Cleveland OH
    Sounds like maybe this?

    Encephilatozoan Cuniculi

    • The vascular system of your rabbit's eye is called the uvea. By the time you notice an infection of Encephalitozoan cuniculi, it will be too late to do anything about it. It's characterized by a white mass appearing in your rabbit's eye. Dr. David L. Williams, DVM, advises that it may be treated with surgery, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), topical steroid creams or anti-parasite medication. This infection occurs while rabbits are in utero."
    • E. Cuniculi (or Encephalitozoon Cunciuli), is a single celled parasite that is very common in rabbits and can cause a variety of problems.
    • It can infect the kidneys, cause urinary problems, eye problems, weight loss, weakness, wobbliness or head tilts, and even death.
    • However, many infected rabbits have no symptoms at all, which means it can pass between rabbits without anyone knowing.
    • Due to the wide nature of E.cuniculi infections, the symptoms can be very variable, they can include;
        • Urinary incontinence or cystitis
        • Increase in drinking and urinating - which is related to the kidney damage
        • Weight loss
        • Muscle weakness - so the rabbit finds it difficult to walk, or falls over a lot.
        • Conjunctivitis, cataracts, sore eyes - this is due to the infection in the eyes and can be very painful.
        • Head tilt - this is due to the infection being present in the brain, to learn more about head tilts, click
        • http://www.yourpetshealth.co.uk/page16.htm#ecunic
     
  6. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    Nov 27, 2009
    Wilmington, NC
  7. Dutchgirl

    Dutchgirl Not Dutch!

    Apr 1, 2008
    U.S.A.
    Very sorry for my delay in replying - I was unable to access a computer until just a few days ago. Unfortunately, the doe had died when I went out the next morning.
    However, thank you all for your help!

    Do you think I should worry about my other rabbits? I sprayed disinfectant on her cage and hosed it off before moving another rabbit into it, and I believe her dishes ran through the dishwasher.
     
  8. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    Nov 27, 2009
    Wilmington, NC
    Sorry to hear you lost your doe.[​IMG]

    If it was E. cuniculi, the rest of your rabbits probably already have it. Many rabbits carry it without ever showing symptoms; frequently, it takes some stress to reduce the rabbit's immune function to the point that the parasite can multiply and cause disease.

    A lot of people give a dose of ivermectin once a month or every couple of months in an effort to keep the parasite under control. You want to be careful about getting the dose right; some have said that too high a dose when a doe is still growing can result in sterility.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2013
  9. hermit01

    hermit01 New Egg

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Did you find out what happened to your doe? I have two in that situation right now. One died, the other is still alive.
     
  10. DutchBunny03

    DutchBunny03 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Northern NY
    Isolate any sick rabbits. If it is contagious, that could limit any further deaths.
     

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