URGENT! Rooster has BAD breath and acts ill

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Then I Will, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. Then I Will

    Then I Will Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 13, 2012
    Annville, Pennsylvania
    Hi Everyone,

    My Rooboy needs help. Yesterday I noticed that his comb was kind of cool and appeared darker at the extremities. The weather has been warm and wet. Today I noticed he did not get off his perch and when I took him down he refused his breakfast. He hobbled around a little but he has a past injury to his hip so he always walks a little odd.

    After church this morning I came home to him sitting in a corner, laying down. He tries to lay down frequently and his breath smells absolutely fowl. It was too easy to catch him and he does not appear energetic, hasn't crowed for several days, and has cold extremeties. His eyes are bright and alert, there are no noises as he breaths, and no discharges from his head.

    I've tried looking up his symptoms but this is all I can find. And it might not be the problem.


    Infectious Bursal Disease (Gumboro)
    Infectious bursal disease is an acute, highly contagious viral disease of young chickens. It is most often found in highly concentrated poultry producing areas. It causes marked morbidity and mortality in affected flocks. Although the disease causes severe losses, its affect on reducing the bird's ability to develop immunity to other diseases may be the most serious effect produced by this disease.
    The transmission or spread of the disease can occur by direct contact (bird to bird), contaminated litter and feces, caretaker, contaminated air, equipment, feed, servicemen and possible insects and wild birds. It is extremely contagious.
    Birds have ruffled feathers, a slight tremor at onset of the disease, strained defecation, loss of appetite and are dehydrated. Affected birds have a tendency to sit and when forced to move, have an unsteady gait. Vent picking is common and a whitish diarrhea frequently develops. A sudden rise in body temperature is followed by a drop to subnormal temperature, prostration and death. Birds surviving the initial infection will recover rapidly within two weeks.
    Postmortem lesions include dehydration and changes in the bursa, skeletal muscle, liver and kidneys. All affected birds have bursal changes characterized by swelling, change in shape (oblong), color (pink, yellow, red, black) and the formation of a gelatinous film around the bursa. Within a few days the bursa shrinks to half its normal size or smaller.
    Diagnosis of infectious bursal disease is based on flock history and postmortem lesions. Laboratory procedures may be used to substantiate the diagnosis.
    Vaccines are available but must be carefully used. If given correctly, good immunity can be developed. There is no specific treatment for infectious bursal disease and indiscriminate medication with certain drugs may severely aggravate mortality. Supportive measures such as increasing heat, ventilation and water consumption are beneficial.

    What could help my Rooboy? Are there any antibiotics I could pick up today or any general medications? Home remedies? I have him in a box in a dark corner of my house to protect the rest of the flock. Any help will be appreciated.
     
  2. susanah

    susanah Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 23, 2009
    Our chicken has sour crop which causes terrible smelling breath. Is his crop ok?
     
  3. Then I Will

    Then I Will Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He hasn't eaten for a full day and a half so his crop is completely empty. I pushed a tube of water and B vitamin down him last night in an effort to hydrate him.
     
  4. Then I Will

    Then I Will Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Annville, Pennsylvania
    I went out and bought an antibiotic. Was directed to use Duramyacin (spelling?) a water soluable teramyacin? (need to look at package once more. Mixed up a gallon of water to the 400-800 mg required and fed him some.

    Will add Vinegar and oil to the diet soon and plan on feeding him some applesauce for nourishment. He hasn't eaten anything for two days.
     
  5. bloom chicks

    bloom chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't have any advice but I am sure someone with experience will help.

    [​IMG]

    I hope he gets better soon.
     
  6. PtldChick

    PtldChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A bad smell is often associated with Coryza, which is more common than Gumboro.

    I would isolate him to determine if that is what he has and keep it from spreading to the rest of your flock.
     
  7. Then I Will

    Then I Will Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 13, 2012
    Annville, Pennsylvania
    The anti-biotic has really cut down on the sour crop smell but he is still wanting to sit around and sleep, and appears unenergetic, doesn't talk much, etc. I am positive it is neither Coryza nor Gumboro as he shows no nasal symptoms.
    I do worry about parasites or some other cause of his crop problem or lack of appetite- I can't imagine what caused the crop to sour as I only feed them good quality food- they free range- there is no compost for them to eat... only the hens would get into the dried dog-food the dog leaves on the porch- I did throw them cooked, seasoned potatoes, seasoned french-fries, and some cooked rice out of the refrigerator, but that is the extent of it.
    I would adventure to worm him but I feel he is too weak. It amazes me. I have taken in (and tried to healthen) a relatives monster chickens- these birds literally- I could not stop them from eating each other alive - they were disgusting broilers meant only for McDonalds McNuggets. They never pooped anything but carmel colored slime, laid horrible sulfur tasting eggs, and didn't know the word preen because they had no feathers except on the neck. Well..they preened the empty feather shafts sometimes. They ate dead things and never had a sour crop. Why my rooster?!! Why oh WHY?!
     
  8. Then I Will

    Then I Will Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 13, 2012
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    Is it normal for a bird with sour crop, after I've administered the anti-biotic and given some strawberry Ensure, applesauce, and oil, etc. to want to sleep constantly? Is this a sign of "going downhill" or is he just recuperating normally and sleeping? His breathing rate is normal.
     

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