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Urgent???

Discussion in 'Quail' started by oreonsam, Oct 1, 2015.

  1. oreonsam

    oreonsam Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 28, 2015
    I've got eleven coturnux eggs in the incubator, its day eighteen and they finally started, at three pm today one started rocking and cheeping, it pipped. Another started to, but the first hasn't done anything for hours, do they stop and take a break after pipping? The last time I hatched a bunch I had one that couldn't get out, it was really taking longer than it should, so I helped him out, and he was a strong healthy chick. Why are they doing this?
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2015
  2. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yes, many times the hatching bird will pip, get a few breaths of fresh air and then take a a long or short nap before they zip, other times they pip and zip from start to finish within a few minutes...
     
  3. nwfl

    nwfl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 4, 2011
    Northwest Florida
    I had a chick pip and do nothing for 3 days. It was the first pip out of 28 eggs. After 26 chicks had hatched and been moved to the brooder I turned off the incubator and planned to clean out it out later. The next morning I heard a loud chirping from the room and it had hatched. turned out to be one of our favorite birds
     
  4. oreonsam

    oreonsam Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 28, 2015
    It's been 15 hours since it pipped now. The other one pipped and stopped too. But I tapped on the incubator and he started cheeping, the other one has not made a sound, however when it was pipping it was trying hard, the egg was rocking all over the place.
     
  5. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    It can take 30 hours for a quail to go from pip to hatch. Leave it alone. If it doesn't make it out on it's own, it just lost its first battle with Darwin. If you let Darwin decide which birds will and wont make it, you'll end up with a healthier flock.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. oreonsam

    oreonsam Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 28, 2015
    I thought that at first, about Darwin, but I helped one chick out last time, and it was strong as ever. I guess it just depends. I've heard people argue that the high calcium diet for egg layers makes the shells to hard for the chicks to escape.
     
  7. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sometimes chicks you help make it. Keep notes and watch those birds over their lifetime. Youll find higher instances of sudden death, less thrift, and generally just less of a bird out of birds you help. Thats assuming the chick is fully formed, and has fully absorbed its yolk, which is often is not the case with birds having a hard time hatching. A percentage of them will be ok, but i still wouldnt keep them in my flock.

    People say a lot of stuff about calcium but I wouldnt worry about it keeping chicks in the shell. My chicks get out of the shell just fine, at least te ones that were fit to do it and I've hatched many many thousands.
     

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