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USe Hay in my Run for Mud but still smells any suggestions?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by had926, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. had926

    had926 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 18, 2011
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    I have been using hay in my Run but after this winter I now notice a bad mell and the mud comes back pretty quickly even with a small rain storm. Is sand better? any other suggestions? Thanks
     
  2. mmaddie's mom

    mmaddie's mom Chillin' With My Peeps

    check out the current sand thread... it should be pretty current & easy to find. I have been using straw in mine but will soon be changing over to sand in my coop and in my run.
     
  3. LindsayB

    LindsayB Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sand will make a world of difference! Make it a little higher in the middle of the run so the water runs out instead of puddling up.
     
  4. MamaChic21

    MamaChic21 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One thing I learned was never to put hay in the run [​IMG]. I have had the muddiest run ever and I tried to put hay, pine wood chips, sand (my ducks ate it [​IMG]). Hay made is stink like there is no tomorrow. They have a new location, a new run (s) right now and all is good. A lot of people will tell you to use sand, that works best for them but I can't. As I mentioned before, my ducks seem to love it [​IMG]. You got all the information right here in BYC. I wish you lots of luck and patience.
     
  5. had926

    had926 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 18, 2011
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    I was thinking maybe putting my grass clippings in the run once i start cutting my grass again but thats not for at least 3 weeks. I might try sand and see what happens. I just need to get rid of the smell. [​IMG] we'll see! Thanks for the Tips!!
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2011
  6. MamaChic21

    MamaChic21 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Once the chickens use the run, eventually it will be muddy sooner or later. However, my reason for the run to be so muddy was the location I have chosen for them. Out of any location in our huge backyard, we have chosen the worst location for them. 2 hill meets right in the middle and you guest it, the middle was where the run was [​IMG]. We found a dryer location where there are no hills what so ever [​IMG]. I realize over time that grass will no longer have grass, then I'll be using other alternatives.

    Keep us posted on what you decide to do.

    Btw, find out more abour DE, I hear it takes the smell away.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2011
  7. krcote

    krcote Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sand is where it's at!
     
  8. Bi0s

    Bi0s Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Bland County VA!!!!!
    Hay stinks gets mold and is nasty when it gets wet not the best thing for a muddy run sand would be your best thing
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Yes, it will do that. See my 'fixing a muddy run' page (link in .sig below) for discussion of pros and cons of things to add to your run, and (perhaps more importantly) ways to start fixing the too-wet problem. Without a multipronged solution you are unlikely to get really useful long-term results.

    Sand (or other aggregates) are useful BUT in my experience they disappear very quickly if added to an already muddy run. So if you want to get maximum bang for your buck (and for your *exercise*, which shovelling and wheelbarrowing lots and lots of aggregate is certainly good for!) it is really best if you can wait til the driest part of the year to add 'em. Otherwise you may be doing the same thing again next year.

    If budget and workload are not a concern, my suggestion would be to do all possible diversion/drainage things (roof gutters, downspouts leading water *far* away, trenching around run, roof run if possible) and if that's not enough then put down some ag lime and cover it with 6-12" of safe tree-chippings for now. Then when the dry season (however 'dry' that is locally) arrives, shovel all that back OUT of the run -- you can use it as mulch on the garden, or till it into the soil in the fall for soil improvement in the garden -- and replace with a substantial amount of sand or other aggregate.

    If you won't be able to remove the muddy chippings, I would be leery of putting them in, though. You can either put in a lot of sand (like 4-6+") *now*, in the knowledge that it will almost certainly be fairly short-lived, or just deal with the mud as best you can til dry season and THEN add your preferred type of aggregate.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  10. Mofarmgirl

    Mofarmgirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Something else that may be an option for you is gravel, tightly packed. You can even spray it off in the summer if it gets to much poo in there, and water will soak in the ground.
     

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