1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    Not a member yet? join BYC here & then introduce yourself in our community forum here.

using a hot potato to take spurs off a rooster?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kat1117, Dec 5, 2014.

  1. kat1117

    kat1117 Chirping

    93
    7
    69
    Jul 26, 2014
    North Carolina
    This is one of those questions you find yourself having a hard time asking because it sounds so stupid. But i have always been told there is never a stupid question. (Until now) Is it ture that you can take a hot baking potato and put it on the roosters spur and it will come off in the potato. If this is a true method of spur removal and does anyone know the correct procedure or is that an old farmers tale? After asking this it does sound weird.:p
     
  2. Teila

    Teila Bambrook Bantams 5 Years

  3. kat1117

    kat1117 Chirping

    93
    7
    69
    Jul 26, 2014
    North Carolina
    I think i might give this a try and see how it goes.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble Premium Member 9 Years

    24,293
    2,903
    526
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    The spur will not come off in the potato. You have to use pliers to easily twist the spur off...easy peasy. Teila's link above shows this procedure.
     
  5. kat1117

    kat1117 Chirping

    93
    7
    69
    Jul 26, 2014
    North Carolina
    i read the link if the quick bleeds how do you stop the bleeding and can it get infected?
     

  6. There are lots of over the counter 'stop bleed' products but in most cases common corn starch or flour will work fine...

    If you want more instant get some alum in the spice isle or hit up a pet store for some styptic powder... FYI most over the counter styptic powders are primarily alum, pretty much one in the same...
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2014
  7. You dont need the hot potatoe at all. Just a pair of pliers. Put the pliers at the base of the spur, twist a little one way and then back again and the spur will pop right off. There will be a little blood. I put the rooster in a cage so no chickens could pick at the blood. Next day put him back on the coop. Good as new with tiny spurs!
     
  8. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Crowing

    3,495
    552
    318
    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    I always saw spurs as necessary with no need to remove them, just maintain them by keeping them short and filed to promote ease of handling, and prevent accidental injury to hens when mating.
     
  9. kat1117

    kat1117 Chirping

    93
    7
    69
    Jul 26, 2014
    North Carolina
    If you saw my granddaughters forehead from his spur it might change your mind as it did mine. I know he uses them for to protect his hens but I'm tying to protect the roo from my husband who would like to put him down.
     
  10. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Crowing

    3,495
    552
    318
    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    Understandable, though I would not allow children in my chicken yard with my rooster. When I was about 7 or 8 years old, the first rooster my Dad had was a huge Plymouth Rock that was very aggressive. He killed a possum that got in the yard once. It took time for me not to be intimidated by him. At first, I used a steel garbage can lid as a shield to protect myself when I would lay feed in the troughs, lol. Eventually I learned how to grab him, pick him up when he'd attack me. My Dad kept his spurs short and filed round at the ends. He could still pack quite a punch if you weren't careful.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: