using artif lite 4 more eggs as days shorten?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by amiachicknorwat, Oct 20, 2015.

  1. amiachicknorwat

    amiachicknorwat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi All, Just yesterday we returned 4 of the 6 roosters we got from when we bought 9 chicks this last June. We thought it was too much rooster action that was stressing our older layers out causing us to receive fewer eggs. We're going to receive laying hens in exchange for the returned roosters from the store of purchase. So two people yesterday, neither of them I consider that experienced in chickenry, said maybe it was the shortening days. Wham, that made sense! If so, should I turn the light on at the end of the day or the beginning and for how long? Much Thanks, Nick
     
  2. hallen01

    hallen01 Out Of The Brooder

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    Have they been through a molt? Yes you can use extra light....I will be setting up on a timer to kick on in the morning for a few extra hours.
     
  3. amiachicknorwat

    amiachicknorwat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi, I got a heat lamp from when the chicks were motherless and less than a week old, but no timer. I'm thinking of putting the lamp on for an hour or so in evening right after they enter the coop for the night. This would work best for me cuz they go to bed a lot earlier than I do (like sundown), but I'd have to get up awful early in the morning just to put a light on before I'd have to go back out there later (early enuf, between like 630 and 7am) to open the coop's flap door to let them into the chicken run, ugh. Maybe I should have the whole thing on a timer, but what fun would that be. I like connecting with them in the morning.
     
  4. Spartan22

    Spartan22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's best to add the supplement light in the morning, if you want have it on (timer) by 5-530 am and have it off by 7-730 am and adjust it accordingly as the daylight get shorter yet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2015
  5. amiachicknorwat

    amiachicknorwat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, I'll see if I can get a timer. Thanks for breaking it to me gently. It's just I woulda preferred the easiest (cheapest) in the evenings. But once timer is in place cant get easier than that
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Don't use a heat light...just a regular 40-60W white incandescent or CFL will work fine.
    It is best to set the timer to come on early mornings, get them up and moving, eating, drinking.
    I've forgotten to turn off the override on the timer and they still went to roost/sleep with the sunset.

    But don't expect immediate results, it takes time for the increased light to generate the chemical responses and production needed to lay eggs.
    The lighting should be ramped slowly starting around September, sudden drastic changes in lighting can be stressful and have undesired consequences.

    Here's a pretty good article on supplemental lighting.
     
  7. amiachicknorwat

    amiachicknorwat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hiigh Aart, Just got a timer and a light together. The light has a shade. I would think bare bulb would be better in coop. Wouldn't collect dust like a lampshade anyway. In the early morn they seem to stir around 5am in spite of sunrise now being 7:34. I guess the around 5 time is the first hint of daybreak. I wonder if that is a good time to start, since I don't open the chicken coop till about 7 or 7:30 these days. Or should I introduce the lighting more gradually starting around 6:30 and graduating towards 5am. Thanks, Nick
     
  8. sniper338

    sniper338 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I beleive you need about 12 hours of light a day... im no expert though... buy a timer from walmart.. like $8... best bulbs are the white light plant growing bulbs. Though a regular clear bulb would probably work just as well. Adjust your timer where they see 12 hours of light each day, but slowly like what was said...


    Putting lights on bitds does shorten their life a year or so over the long run.. but when they dont lay good anymore they go to freezer camp anyways and are replaced by a younger bird around my house...
     
  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I think I would rather have the shade collect dust than the bulb itself, plus the shade reflects the light down where you want it.
    I ramp mine up about 30 minutes per week(smallest increment on my timer) until I'm up to about 14-15 hours...then keep changing it to keep it at 14-15 hours.
    I've got it set to turn off about 1-2 pm, just because it's so dim in my coop on cloudy days.
    Did you read the article I linked?
     
  10. amiachicknorwat

    amiachicknorwat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    H'aart, I went with the bulb, at first anyways. I had already removed the shade before I read your reply. It took some tinkering, unscrewing etc, so now I rationalize that their roosts are high and they generally like the highest perch. Then there are no hooks on ceiling directly above them anyways. There are hooks in the middle of the coop floor and an outlet nearby, so I went without the shade to cast the light around. If they want there are spots in coop where they can find shade, if they want, but I really doubt they do. Got it set from 6 to 7. Can go in half hour increments, so plan to set it back to 530 in a week, I guess? I did read and she said those rope lights she used are incandescent and not LED. Are cheaper-to-run LED incandescent, light quality-wise? The chick chick has a nice site. Will peruse more. Much Thanks, Nick
     

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