1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Using Metal shed as coop, need some tips

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Morgan7782, Sep 23, 2010.

  1. Morgan7782

    Morgan7782 Dense Egg Goo

    2,013
    46
    201
    Mar 22, 2010
    Sacramento CA
    I will be using a metal 6x8 6 ft tall storage/garden shed as a coop. I need tips on adding venelation while keeping the inside rain proof. I will be putting styrafoam insulation on the first 4 feet of the walls, with plywood to protect against any "curious chickens".

    Weather here in Sacramento is mild winters. Rain, but it doesn't seem to get down to 30F much, and NEVER snows.

    Summers are dry and hot, (averages about 90-92 degrees daytime) not humid though. The coop will be positioned under shade for during the day. Also, this coop is ONLY for night and laying, they free range from 8am to 8pm every day. They do not use a run.

    How can I add proper venelation in a shed without losing the rain proof aspect? I was thinking of drilling holes about a quarter inch round and putting one of those slanted rain protecting vent covers over it. I have heard 1-2 feet of venelation per chicken.

    I will be housing 5-7 chickens in this coop, and about 10 feet will be used for feed storage.

    Any help or tips from people who have converted a shed into a coop or for coop venelation would be wonderful!!

    (I was able to find a free metal shed on craigslist, but have not found any wood sheds under 650.00, wish I could afford that but I can't)
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2010
  2. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,852
    31
    249
    May 23, 2009
    DFW
    Those little quarter inch round holes aren't really going to give you much ventilation. You'd have to drill more than 144 of them, just to get a single square foot of vent! You could cut rectangular vents nearly the length of two of your walls (opposite walls, ideally), and 6 to 8 inches wide. Place these vents as high as possible up at the top of the walls. Then, fashion a flap the same size as the vent, hinge it like an awning on the outside. These flaps not only prevent rain from coming in, they also make it possible for you to close down some of the ventilation when it gets really cold.

    Like this:

    [​IMG]

    Of course, you'll want to cover the vents with hardware cloth so no critters can climb in and get after your chickens.
     
  3. Morgan7782

    Morgan7782 Dense Egg Goo

    2,013
    46
    201
    Mar 22, 2010
    Sacramento CA
    I like that idea thank you! And the picture helped a lot. I am unable to build anything where I live at the moment, just don't have any area safe to handle tools and nails and such. The wood sheds are VERY pricey too, and craigslist only seems to have metal sheds around Northern California [​IMG] At least in my price range. Ideally it would be wood, but can't pull that off right now. Our weather is pretty mild compared to more middle states and east coast. I couldn't figure out how to add venelation without compromising the rainproof aspect, and thank you that did help! [​IMG] anybody else feel free to share idea's!
     
  4. PepsNick

    PepsNick Back to Business

    May 9, 2010
    Egglanta, GA
    Elmo is correct. Why do you need wood instead of metal? I'd just go with metal cause it's waiting or you! And I would say have about 3 nest boxes. I always like two for laying and a third for broody hens. And outside aces to the boxes is a must!! I would also say pit a small pen in there for sick birds etc. Hope I can help!
     
  5. birdicus7

    birdicus7 Chillin' With My Peeps

    233
    0
    89
    Jul 17, 2010
    Coatesville, PA
    I think I would go to you local Lowe's or Home Depot or a recycle shop and see if you can find some metal duct covers/diffusers. They come in many sizes, will have an inside lip to cover any sharp exposed metal from your cuts and you can just drill a few holes to pop rivet them on. If you feel the need to close them you can make covers for the inside or just duct tape over them and take it off later. Once you install them you can seal the edges with caulk. Depending on the size you get you could place hardware cloth underneath before attaching. Make sure you by ones that have the slats all facing one direction. like a return duct cover. Others face opposite direction of each other and would not be as rainproof as the first style.
     
  6. Morgan7782

    Morgan7782 Dense Egg Goo

    2,013
    46
    201
    Mar 22, 2010
    Sacramento CA
    Thank you very much for the tips! That is exactly what I was thinking birdicus, that home depot cover with the slanted slats. Good tips all thank you!

    I have heard wood is always better, just doesn't get as cold/hot as metal which I know is a fact. But I cannot afford the prebuilt sheds or kits, and do not have a proper area to build one [​IMG] Wish I did.

    But I figure with proper venelation and some insulation metal could work in my climate. I will have a smaller 6x3 coop for a broody coop (IF anybody becomes broody) and if they don't I can isolate sick birds in there. [​IMG] Once I take down their run and crate/coop there will be enough room to have the two coops [​IMG] I am excited!! I know my girls cannot wait either because I am at the min space requirements and I really want them to be happy and comfortable.

    How about a window? What is the most wallet friendly way to create a window while not letting rain in? Some sort of overhang? Or like the above picture and use a hinged 'weatherproofer'? Thanks again!!
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2010
  7. PepsNick

    PepsNick Back to Business

    May 9, 2010
    Egglanta, GA
    window is totally worth it! chickens depend upon light for energy. and egglaying!! plus you can peek through and see if everybody's ok. well im so glad youll have the new coop, sounds exciting!!!!

    and by the way, you have a dark brahma. HEH. SHE'S GONNA GO BROODY!
     
  8. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2011
  9. geebs

    geebs Lovin' the Lowriders!

    4,800
    14
    231
    Sep 28, 2008
    While the walls are open is a great time to depest... you can spread some DE around and/or paint the wood with motor oil...this discourages mites etc... Just a thought.
     
  10. Morgan7782

    Morgan7782 Dense Egg Goo

    2,013
    46
    201
    Mar 22, 2010
    Sacramento CA
    Thank you for the tips! I am glad to have them [​IMG] I will accomidate the shed as best as possible for the chickens and love the idea of a window of some sort. I was thinking of using some sort of overhang to keep rain from getting in the window, or a similar set up as above with a hinged "closing" plexiglass window. The things most important to me is space, venelation and sunlight [​IMG] I will have all these idea's in mind when I finally get the shed!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by