Using trees as posts for my run?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Gridguru, Feb 24, 2016.

  1. Gridguru

    Gridguru Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    24
    61
    Jan 30, 2016
    Dallas, TX area.
    So now that the coup building process is getting close to the end, I am starting to think about building the run.

    We have a lot of post oaks in the yard (lots...like 300 of em). Post oaks grow very straight, thus the name. The area I plan to build the run is in an opening with trees on three of the sides. I was thinking, I might be able to have a bigger run, by somehow using the trees as some of my posts, rather than having the posts inside of the opening. The trees would all be on the outside of the run, so I wouldn't have to figure out how to seal around the trees at the top of the coop.

    It would give it a somewhat irregular shape, but that might be cool, if not more difficult to build/layout.

    I am thinking I may be able to attach 2x4s to the trees and build my run framing off of them. Granted, I may have to remove and reset the boards attached to the trees as they grow, but that wouldn't be too often as these are mostly fully grown trees.

    Thoughts, concerns? Has anyone else done something like this?
     
  2. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

    12,748
    5,692
    436
    Feb 25, 2014
    Northwestern Wyoming
    My Coop
    I have one concern. Will you be able to cover that run? I agree that it would be really cool to have an irregularly shaped run, and the shade would be wonderful for the chickens. But what will you do about predators? Those trees right at the outside edge of the run would make a dandy place for them to climb up and then launch themselves right in with your flock. Birds of prey, raccoons, possums, even rats could make their way in and would appreciate you having done some of the work of gaining access for them.
     
  3. N F C

    N F C dem crazy bones Premium Member

    35,710
    13,807
    676
    Dec 12, 2013
    Wyoming
    Blooie's right on about predators using the trees. Another reason to use a cover would be to keep any of your birds from flying up into the branches.

    Other than that, I think using your trees as posts would be a real cost saver!
     
  4. Gridguru

    Gridguru Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    24
    61
    Jan 30, 2016
    Dallas, TX area.
    Oh, it will definitely still be covered with HW cloth. The run will be a fully framed unit with hardware cloth around the whole thing.

    With all of the trees, I am sure i'll have plenty of predators on top of my run and coop, so i'll make sure it's VERY secure and strong enough to hold any animal that ends up on it.

    I plan to set up a trail cam for a while to see what exactly is hanging around there at night.
     
  5. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

    12,748
    5,692
    436
    Feb 25, 2014
    Northwestern Wyoming
    My Coop
    Smart plan!!
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    20,278
    3,573
    496
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    In my opinion that should work fine. I’ll leave the details of predator-proofing up to you, but if trees are available it is common practice to use them as fence posts when building cattle or horse fences. I grew up doing that and when I built a barbed wire fence on the extra acre I bought most of the section along the road uses trees instead of posts.
     
  7. Heltor Chasca

    Heltor Chasca New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    Feb 21, 2016
    Maybe use nylon nails so when you saw the trees for firewood (if that's part of your long term plan) you don't have an accident. Chain saws and metal nails are an interesting mix.

    I like it though. Natural coops look better and make for happy chooks. I planted an apple tree in my run and the birds also free range. I have 'pruned' the chicken mesh around the tree and every year I make adjustments to to wire so it doesn't cut into the tree.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by