Vaccination schedule of different diseases for newly born chicks

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by bangi, Dec 9, 2014.

  1. bangi

    bangi Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2014
    Hello dear friends.
    I'm expecting new chicks from my broody hen in few days.I want to vaccinate them for all kind of possible diseases of backyard chickens.I want to know, at which age and for which disease I may vaccinate them.I need complete schedule.
    any kind of help will be appreciated.
    thanks
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    You may get lots of varying suggestions that will reflect the vast array of management techniques.

    I don't vaccinate for anything, ever.

    Many people will vaccinate for Marek's. That is most effective as day olds and may be less effective for a broody raised chick since any Marek's virus in the environment will be in a race with the vaccine so would have a head start in a natural setting before you can catch the chicks and vaccinate.
    Also, if they are from your flock, they're likely naturally resistant to strains in your area.

    There's also a coccidiosis vaccine that some are starting to use. Again, proper management precludes the need. A foraging flock with a broody hen are unlikely to have a problem with coccidia.

    Other vaccines would depend on your location and climate or known pathogens in your area. If you have a healthy flock, you're unlikely to need anything.

    Here's the complete list and schedule but keep in mind that these are for commercial flocks that live in extreme concentrations where pathogens rapidly take hold.
    http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/pou..._poultry/vaccination_programs_in_poultry.html
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2014
  3. bangi

    bangi Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2014
    ChickenCanoe
    Thank you very much for ur valuable words.
     
  4. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Hi Bangi, for a relevant answer people would need to know where you live. You haven't added that info to your profile yet.

    You generally shouldn't use vaccines in the case of the disease the vaccine is designed for not even being present in your country or region. Doing so can introduce the disease to the region.

    For a complete schedule you will need to contact your relevant government authority, or similar. It has to be tailored to your region and the diseases present there. Different countries sometimes use different vaccines and have different strains of the same disease, so it must be specific.

    Also, if you want to breed for resistance, (it's not an option for everyone, admittedly, as it can be emotionally draining or financially non-feasible) --- you can't once you've vaccinated them. Probably not relevant to your situation though.

    (I do breed for resistance, but that's not the route most would advise you to take. Some of the diseases are outstripping the vaccine control as they continually mutate, Marek's for example... The vaccine enables susceptible birds to pass on their weaker genes, since it prevents them developing some symptoms but does not prevent them from catching the disease, and the disease has only been getting stronger throughout the years of vaccines being used to try to control it. The vaccine isn't a cure. The reason I mention this is that you state you want to vaccinate against everything they could possibly catch. That would likely create a greater problem than not vaccinating. I don't vaccinate at all, nor use artificial antibiotics or medications, and over the years of keeping chooks I've had almost zero disease deaths in adults and zero disease deaths in chicks, so obviously I'm happy with how that works for me, but it doesn't work out the same for everyone).

    Anyway... It's all a lot of very personal choices and as with anything it's worth doing a lot of reading up on. Your local livestock authority, possibly other chicken keepers in your area, can probably give you more applicable advice than we can.

    You may also have legal or regulatory obligations you have to comply with regarding whether or not you vaccinate for certain diseases. If you plan to run a commercial operation there, selling chickens to others as breeding stock or selling eggs or their meat, you may have to look into your local laws about that; there may be some vaccines you have to use first.

    Whether you vaccinate or not, good husbandry methods will ultimately determine the majority of the outcomes of all cases, regarding either losing them to common diseases or not losing them.

    Best wishes and good luck.
     
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  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    X2, good post.

    Best wishes.
     
  6. bangi

    bangi Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2014
    chooks4life
    thanks a lot for ur helpful post.
    I live in jalalabad, Afghanistan.
    last month 3 of my pullets(were very near to laying eggs) died of some kind of respiratory illness.they were very cute and beautiful.
    I do not want my chickens to die when they're near laying.
    I do not prefer vaccination but can't see my chicken die.
     
  7. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    In Asia and the Middle East, there are many different pathogens we don't have here. Your best bet is to contact some government entity that deals with poultry production if such a thing exists there. Good luck.
     
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  8. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Fair enough. Even with vaccination they can die though so it's best to hedge your bets as much as you can. Giving them garlic regularly can help, and if you can get hydrogen peroxide without any additives and add that to their drinking water at the first sign of a respiratory issue, it can knock out even serious respiratory symptoms within 24 hours.

    There's a good chance your surviving hens are now carriers of the disease that killed the others, they may not be, but that's generally how it goes with contagious respiratory diseases.

    I agree with what Chicken Canoe said, you need local info as it may well be a disease we've not got around here.

    Best wishes, and good luck.
     

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