Various eye issues

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lfoose, Nov 26, 2007.

  1. lfoose

    lfoose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 1, 2007
    Medina, OH
    Hi,

    I have three hens w/three eye issues.

    The first one has one eye that is runny w/clear liquid. Eye drops don't seem to help. She seems to be dusting alot. I see her sitting in the dusting box alot. I don't see mites or lice on her. If I bring her in the house, she is fine after a couple of days. Is there any suggestion on her eye? Is it possible she has mites and I am just missing it? The coop is ventilated, no urine smell and clean.

    The second one is Penny who was sick a while ago. She has the same thing again. Runny nose and crusty swollen eye. Appears to be miserable. Last time the vet had me give her antibiotics twice a day. A crushed pill in water. He thought it was the Myoplast....word. Sorry can't spell worth a darn. List members suggested it was coryza. Is it strange for her to have gotten sick so quickly? Will she always be a sick bird or am I doing something to cause this? Will the Tylan 50 be good to use?

    The third bird has one eye that is closed. It started off as having a bit of bubbly stuff in the corner of the eye. Now it is just closed. No crust. Eye drops didn't do much to help. This is a rather petite silkie bantie rescue.

    ANy suggestions on any of these. I checked all of them for mites and i don't see anything. Like I said, the coop is clean. They get their usual boring chicken feed plus there is a small supply of cracked corn, sun flower seeds, oyster shell and scratch.

    The dustbox is a combo of dirt, ash and a touch of DE. I use the deep litter method w/hay.

    I am new to all of this and am sure even dispite my best intentions, I am making errors. (Motherhood but with 10 instead of just one!) I am bothered by all of this and I don't know if I am doing something wrong or if I just have a poor flock of hens. Most came from a local farmer that kept them in unclean conditions and fed them only cracked corn.

    Thanks all!
     
  2. lfoose

    lfoose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 1, 2007
    Medina, OH
    Hi,

    Can anyone offer any suggestions on these eye issues? Below is a link to a picture of Penny's eye. Both eyes are like this now. Our local TSC didn't have any Tylan so I had to order it thru the mail and it's on it's way.

    While she doesn't have much of a runny nose, she seems congested and below the eyes are swollen.

    http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a245/lfoose/image001.png
     
  3. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    The tylan is the correct med...I am assuming this is the injectible tylan?
    please go to featherfanciers.com and ask Peter Brown on the forum there for instructions on a nasal flush (in addition to systemic use)... he can help you with specific instructions for that.
     
  4. lfoose

    lfoose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 1, 2007
    Medina, OH
    I will do that. Thank you dlhunicorn.

    Yes it is the injectable Tylan 50. 1 cc for three days in between the shoulder blades?

    Does this look like the coryza to you?
     
  5. k9trainer

    k9trainer Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 27, 2007
    Ovilla, Texas
    why do you inject it between the shoulder blades and not in the breast? and how would you go about doing that?
     
  6. lfoose

    lfoose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 1, 2007
    Medina, OH
  7. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    ...with eyes so swollen (and possibly the nares plugged up) ...you will most likely need a nasal flush with the tylan also...(Peter Brown at featherfanciers.com can advise you on that)
    Here is additional information on injecting Tylan:
    http://www.afn.org/~poultry/newsletr/1996/psep96.pdf
    Chicken Medications
    by Dr. James Barton and Clarence Gillihan
    (excerpt)
    ".....Bacterial Diseases:
    Purchase a bottle of Tylan 50 and several 3cc
    syringes with 25 to 30 gauge 1/2" needles. Give your hen 1 to 1 1/2 cc. of Tylan under the skin of the neck .........Continue daily injections for three days but not more than five. Withdrawal time is one month. Tylan does not have much activity against coccidia, but it is very good against Mycoplasma bacteria which is responsible for some respiratory diseases.

    To inject Tylan 50, pull the hens feathers back
    to reveal the skin on base of the the neck on her back.
    Lift the skin up and insert the needle gentlty but firmly into the skin just far enough to allow the Tylan to be injected. You will be able to feel it. Be careful that you do not inject yourself. Make certain that you do not push the needle through the skin and out again not injecting at all....
    Because Tylan is so powerful, it is recommended
    that you purchase some Beneficial Bird Bacteria
    and feed it to your chicken after she recovers.
    Tylan wipes out all the benficial bacteria that is normally present in a chickens digestive system. Also, Tylan can kill skin cells near the site of the injection so you should not use anything stronger than Tylan 50 - a stronger variety, Tylan-200 is also available at your local feed store, but this will likely do more harm than good.

    When purchasing syringes, get them from a
    local drug store. The 'human' grade needles are a little sharper than the vetrinary grade. The cost is about the same and your hen will thank you...."
     
  8. lfoose

    lfoose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have the Tylan and the needles on it's way from feather fanciers. I'll take your suggestion and get some human needles to use instead. I posted a request for info on the nasal flush.

    Right now I have her in the house. She isn't eating much and I am dripping vitamin water into her mouth.
     
  9. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    keeping her hydrated is extremely important...when they are sick they make things ten times worse by not drinking sufficiently. Keep the feed moist (with water or adding cooked oatmeal to it) to help hydration...offer live culture yogurt can also be helpful.
     

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