Vegetable shortening and ducklings

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by enriquec, Aug 21, 2014.

  1. enriquec

    enriquec Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey,

    Everything I've seen online indicates there is no way to artificially duplicate the process by which a mother duck transfers protective oils to her young. Why not? I don't see any reason why the very wax like Crisco product, vegetable shortening, couldn't or shouldn't be used to have the same effect.

    Any input? I have an impossible time believe it can't be done but I'm shocked by the lack of information available.
     
  2. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    I don't think crisco and mothers wax from an oil gland is close to being the same and putting crisco on your ducklings would maybe be like them being in an oil slick?
     
  3. Richb353

    Richb353 Chillin' With My Peeps

    As messy as the ducks are I suppose the grease would cause more dirt, dust, crumbles stick to them. The natural oils are said to provide insulation and water repellency. From the ducklings I've raised, it really doesn't make a difference. Sure they look silly when they get soaked, but I always kept a heat lamp in their brooder for them to dry off next to. It said they could get waterlogged and drown, but I always kept a ramp or island in their tub and they know enough to swim or sunbathe. By three weeks they have enough meat on their bones to manage their own body heat. The only time I've seen the ducklings huddled near a heat lamp was their first week.

    Basically, your normal duckling raising routine covers any need for oils in the first place.

    Just my .02
     
  4. Amykins

    Amykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Crisco is a bad idea. It'd be like putting crisco on your hair to try and duplicate the natural oils your hair follicles produce - it just ain't the same. your ducklings' oil glands will start revving up between 1-2 weeks of life, so until then all you gotta do is supervise them during a lukewarm bath and get them back under the heat lamps to dry.
     
  5. enriquec

    enriquec Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Interesting, I found Purcellin Oil, a laboratory-created version of the duck preen gland oil. It seems its only application is in a skin product. The only other mention of it in animal application I found was this:

    https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/jfo/v043n03/p0222-p0233.pdf

    Quote: I don't like the idea of having to worry about them doing what they love, swimming. My house is surrounded by a lake, pool, 2 ponds, and 1 indoor pond. I'd much rather they start off able to do those things safely. Plus, mentally, it seems ridiculous humans haven't found a way to do this yet. There's always a way. Granted, it may not be vegetable shortening.
     
  6. enriquec

    enriquec Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you guys. 1-2 weeks? I've been reading 6-8 but that sounds much better.
     
  7. Amykins

    Amykins Overrun With Chickens

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    I think it maaaaaybe would take that long if you never introduce your duck to water for swimming, but I know that if you do start 'em early in the tub it sort of jumpstarts their oil gland. Neat, huh?
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. GodsProvision

    GodsProvision Out Of The Brooder

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    We have seven baby Muscovy ducks that have been in a brooder for two weeks. I did hear they get their waterproofing from their mother, but did not understand what that meant exactly. If I am understanding everyone correctly, they will be able to waterproof on their own? If so, this is good news. We have our other mother duck sitting on 15 or so more eggs due to hatch around 9/19 by my estimation.
     
  9. Going Quackers

    Going Quackers Overrun With Chickens

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    Completely not needed. I raise ducks here too.. and they are no less waterproofed than the ducks here that have been raised by their mothers, the babies with mothers do get waterproofed SOONER but in the long run one does not have more than another.

    The key with raising your own is not to leave them excessively in water and to ENSURE they are dry and warm, chill kills babies. Beyond an injury their is no way artificial means are needed.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. GodsProvision

    GodsProvision Out Of The Brooder

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    We have a heat lamp for the brooder and clean it out regularly. We have been letting them run around some indoors, but have not had them outdoors recently. We are unsure how soon we should have them within earshot of their mother. We did not want to have to separate them, but our drake and the other mother duck seemed to be more than playful with them. With the other mother duck sitting on her own eggs, we do not want to upset that either. Getting off topic a bit here.
     

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