Ventalation vs. draft help...pic heavy

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by savingpurple, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. savingpurple

    savingpurple Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 2, 2011
    NW Ohio
    Here is the ventalation my husband bought. Think they are called "gable vents"? Not sure right now.

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    Here is 2 angles to which they would be put....

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    Here is the inside of each side to which they would be installed.....

    Now I have to tell you I had a bad night one night when they all tried to go higher, and the roofing nails were an issue...oh my..what a night...one of the first in the coop. We covered the ledges with cardboard and that seemed to solve the problem....

    The side opposite the roost...

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    The side above the roost...(2 views)

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    Will these vents work with the cardboard in place for proper ventalation this winter with out creating a draft? I am in NW Ohio.

    I am just so confused in this area...sorry to be such a confused chicken owner...a newbie, and want to do it right !! Hindsight is great:) Will the cardboard be enough of a deterant of the cold air???
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    Have you seen Pat's ventilation page? Rather than guess (maybe badly) I'll let you be the judge. One thing, though, I wouldn't worry much about draft if the ventilation is up high. Air exchange will be at the vents. Drafts on birds happen I think mostly if a door is drafty or a window blows on them, that sort of thing.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=1642-VENTILATION
     
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    You are doing fine. Don't worry. Your eave intake plan seems well thought out. I like the cardboard shields, or baffles. Good.

    Now, think this word, VENT. Where is the air finally going to vent? Your eave soffits will be letting air enter. Where will it vent out, taking the ammonia and humidity with it?
     

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