Ventilating insulated walls

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by kimbobim, Apr 23, 2009.

  1. kimbobim

    kimbobim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 23, 2009
    Highland, Utah
    I've searched on the ventilation threads, and haven't seen this question answered. All of the ventilation pictures with flaps, etc., I've found are for non-insulated coops in warmer climates. How do you build ventilation flaps into insulated walls? I hope I can explain myself properly: we are building an 8 x 10 coop, framing the walls with 2 x 4s and using OSB on the inside walls and T111 siding on the outside walls, with insulation batts sandwiched between. In addition to a few windows, I am planning on cutting long ventilation flaps in the exterior siding running the length of each of the 10 foot walls (6 inches tall, at the very top of each wall, up under the eaves), as well as on each of the 8 foot walls. These will be hinged so I can lower/close them. When framing the walls, what do I need to do to keep the insulation inside the wall from getting wet when the ventilation flaps are open?

    Has anyone built an insulated coop with this sort of ventilation? Should I nail a board horizontally between the framing studs at the top of the insulation level - sort of like a mini header? I'm not sure what else would work - does anyone have any suggestions? Any pictures of insulated & ventilated coops would be very much appreciated!

    thanks, everyone!
     
  2. azelgin

    azelgin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I did similar on my coop, but the vents are also windows. I framed the opening with a header at the top, the same as if I were going to instal windows. I then made top hinged greenhouse plastic windows that swig out and hook to the eave over hang (I have a 4' eave on that side. Here is a picture. The "vents' are in the metal siding wall. It's hard to make out the window panels.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Just frame it out as if it were a window. With 2x4 above and below the opening, you know? to block off the stud space? does that make sense?

    Pat
     
  4. kimbobim

    kimbobim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 23, 2009
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    Quote:Yes, I think I understand the picture in the Azelgin's post and your suggestion. I'm just wondering that since the flap/opening will run almost the entire ten foot length, if I should have vertical framing in there to support the roof (rather than having it be one ten-foot long uninterrupted window/opening). I think I'll frame the upright 2 x 4 studs like a normal wall, and then put 2 x 4's horizontally between them. Or maybe make the flap opening a shorter length, but deeper - 6ft x 1 ft, rather than 10 ft x 6 inches. I may not be making any sense here. I'll have post pictures of the framing once I've got it up.

    thanks for the help!
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Quote:Yes, exactly. The opening will have studs running through it, with the spaces between the studs blocked off with 2x4s so you can't see "into" the wall space.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  6. Portalguy

    Portalguy Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 26, 2009
    Ripton, Vermont
    Quote:Thanks for an excellent and highly informative page.

    In planning the height of the ventilation, I am wondering if the chickens roost atop the nesting boxes; which would raise their median height and change my plans.

    Sorry if this is a dumb question but I'm new to keeping chickens.

    Cheers!
    Rob in Vermont
     
  7. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Quote:Usually people try to avoid having them roost on the nestboxes, for a variety of reasons. Either keep the nestboxes distinctly lower than the roost (and usually the nestbox roofs are made sloped at a 45 degree angle so they can't perch on top), or put them underneath a very wide droppings board under the roosts so that the roof of the nestbox is the droppings board. And clean the droppings board every morning.

    The first arrangement is by far the more common, but the second works too, at least for me.

    Basically if you put your winter-use ventilation at the top of the walls -- which is where it'll work best -- it doesn't *matter* what height everything else is; and in the summertime it is perfectly fine to have open ventilation next to the roost or etc, because it will function more as a refreshing breeze than as a draft. (Assuming you remember to close the window, or whatever it is, if a storm is going to blow cold rain in during the night [​IMG])

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     

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