Ventilation vs. Drafts - Is this design going to be drafty?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by bayareapilot, Jun 28, 2010.

  1. bayareapilot

    bayareapilot Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 8, 2010
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    [​IMG]

    I have the above Chick-N-Cabin. If you'll notice the upper floor roosting bars are right by the hardware mesh 'window'. I've read that drafts are bad for chickens but ventilation is crucial. So, is that hardware mesh window (right near the upper floor roosting bars) going to be too drafty for my chickens or is that an appropriate amount of 'ventilation'.

    Thanks, in advance!
     
  2. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    What are San Francisco winters like??? Really, you almost can't have too much ventilation as long as you have a way of covering some of it in adverse weather. It looks like that would be really easy to simply screw a window sized sheet of plexiglass on the outside over the window if you guys dip into the 30s or lower over the winter season. Then just remove it for spring... [​IMG]

    Clarity issues..
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2010
  3. bayareapilot

    bayareapilot Out Of The Brooder

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    Maybe around 50 degrees at the lowest (rare that we ever go much lower). Winters are pretty mild.


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  4. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    The 50s, even overnight, in winter??? I'm so jealous!! As long as you guys stay in the 40s and up, your chickens should be fine even with no extra covering on those windows. Really, the main difference between ventilation and drafts (good/bad) is temperature. Cold air blowing on you (or your chickens) in cold weather does NOT feel good. That same air blowing on you in warm weather feels pretty good. Now, if there's a chance that, in winter time, overnight, temps COULD dip into the 30s, I'd probably still put something over that one window, because there's still tons of ventilation left over.
     
  5. bayareapilot

    bayareapilot Out Of The Brooder

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    Will do! Many thanks! This is my first time at raising chickens, so I'm trying to do as much 'right' as I can. :0)


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  6. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    You'll be fine. They can always go into the 'indoor' nest area if there is a cold breeze or something, which shouldn't happen very often where you are [​IMG]

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  7. JMPE

    JMPE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would just be sure that the window does not face the prevailing wind. They chickens won't be bothered by the cold but if they get damp from onshore breeze, mist and fog, they'll be mad as a wet hen. [​IMG]
     
  8. bayareapilot

    bayareapilot Out Of The Brooder

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    I *think* I'm okay there, the window faces a plum tree and sits low in the garden which is surrounded by fences with lots of wind breaks - certainly some wind find its' way there but I wouldn't think it would be a strong, ongoing, prevailing wind. I'm entertaining the notion of setting up a precautionary windbreak, to create a 'dead air' space.

    Thanks! [​IMG]


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  9. GoAngels

    GoAngels Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:San Francisco winters are very much like their summers....pretty much 6 months of spring and 6 months of fall. As Mark Twain said "The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco."
     
  10. bayareapilot

    bayareapilot Out Of The Brooder

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    That's about it... Best part is that when I want to go and play in snow I can drive and see the snow and when I'm done with snow I can turn around and leave it behind. I remember some nasty winters in Chicago when I was visiting a relative or two as a kid during Xmas season. I'm glad I don't have to deal with that - always remember how the road salt in the Winters would eat up my uncle's car.

    Quote:San Francisco winters are very much like their summers....pretty much 6 months of spring and 6 months of fall. As Mark Twain said "The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco."
     

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