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Ventilation/windows for coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by jamiebartlett, Jul 29, 2007.

  1. jamiebartlett

    jamiebartlett Songster

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    Mar 19, 2007
    Hi, I'm turning a bunny hutch into a small coop for 3-4 silkie bantams maybe polish or frizzles, depends on what comes available. I may even have to wait til next spring. My question is - the front of the entire hutch is made out of 1/4 inch hardwire so the bunnies could see out before then the other three sides were solid. What's the general rule of thumb for ventilation, draftiness, etc when it comes to feathered silkies or bantams? How much of it do I need to CLOSE up or how much of it do I need to keep open? Thanks! Jamie:D
     
  2. allen wranch

    allen wranch Crowing Premium Member

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    It depends on where you live and the time of year. Lots of ventilation is good in the summer, but if you are in a cold winter climate, you need a way to close off the front, yet still allow some ventilation.

    Also, if you have a wire floor, a piece of plywood or something similar will be better on their feet and keep out drafts.

    Most people add an overhang on the front to keep rain from blowing in.
     
  3. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Well, My birds sleep outside of their homes year long. A few of the smaller ones went inside for a few nights when it was down in the teens, but that's it.
     
  4. 2mnypets

    2mnypets Songster

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    Galesburg, IL.
    Our coops have a window on the west and south sides. We also have a ventilation window on the north side in addition to the north and south windows that are in the brooder area of the coop. Then of course their chicken doors (which is also the chicken ramp).
     

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