Venting coop in the winter

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by tsiecz, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. tsiecz

    tsiecz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 1, 2011
    Pendleton,NY
    My coop is 4' x 8' and has 2 -6" x 24" vents at the top of each side of the slanted roof(4-total). How close is to close for the chickens to roost to the vents? Should I put a piece of plywood on the inside to act a a damper so they wont get a draft? I was thinking of plywood on the 2x4s on the inside so it would still draw air in and out. With the 3-1/2 space for air to still vent but couldn't blow on them. Will that be enough air movement in the coop? Too Much?
    Any Ideas?? Right now the are roosting about 6" lower than the vents but with winter coming and our changing wind direction ,I worry about how much air they will be getting on them.
     
  2. Ole rooster

    Ole rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 25, 2011
    Milner, Georgia
    For an old man your description doesn't relate. Are the vents on top of the roof or in a gable? I they are on top I would worry with it. But you get a lot of snow up there so that may be something to think about.
     
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    To "vent" means to provide places near the top underside of the roof, or metal ridge vents or roof vents that allow the gasses and humidity to escape. The air can enter at the lowest part of the roof through vented eaves.

    If you look at 90% of the houses around you, you'll see it. The are soffit vent on the underside of your overhangs, and/or vent high up toward the peak on the siding. There will also be vents, either as vent caps on your roof, up high, or there will be a continuous roof at the ridge. This allows air to "vent" or escape.
     
  4. Hawkeye95

    Hawkeye95 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I was reading somewhere else that said your roosts should be 12 to 18 inches below your vents. Your roosts really don't need to be very high up and by lowering them down a bit, you'll help with drafts being right on your birds. So yeah, I'd lower them down a bit. [​IMG] If you didn't want to lower them down, what about one of those clear plastic vent deflectors? You could turn it so it faces up so incoming drafts will be vented into the roof.
     

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