very anemic goat

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by VKat, Jan 19, 2015.

  1. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I got two goats very cheap from someone who was selling their whole herd. The previous owner said he had been going through a tough time and couldn't afford to feed them over the winter. I figured it was a great opportunity for me to get started. Should have realized it was a red flag.
    I'm new to goats and now I have animals that need extra care.
    My older (they said she is 5 years) doe had a serious digestive upset almost 2 weeks ago, I found her down and her rumen was silent. Treated for bloat, and she got better. I had her inside from the cold, and kept her several days to make sure she was really okay before outfitting her with a coat and letting her rejoin her pals.

    After all of that, following advice given online here, I checker her eyelid color and found her to be very anemic.
    Immediately got Ivermectin and treated that day.
    She has been losing weight.
    Her appetite is good.
    Both her and the second goat I got from that sale have rough coats compared to my other doe not from that sale.
    Both seem skinny.
    This anemic goat has a bald tail tip too.

    I have marked on my calendar 10 day intervals to re-dose the Ivermectin 2 more times.
    I am feeding them Dumor goat pellets, Manna Pro loose minerals free choice, and second cut hay I get from a local store is always available.
    I've also been adding unsulphured molasses, and probios.
    But she is still deathly pale.

    I ordered Copper bolus Copasure for goats online, and am getting Red Cell to give her.
    What more can I do?
    If anyone with experience can give me advice- what is best to get them back to health?
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2015
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    While it sounds like you have had good guidance here so far, I would suggest that it is time to consider having the goat properly vetted. Unfortunately, those here are only able to advise based on what you post and your inexperience with goats leaves you at a disadvantage in assessing certain things that a more experienced herdsman may note. Having actual, experienced, hands-on evaluation of the goat may be the difference in her bouncing back or not.

    It also sounds like you have had both the new goats mixing with your other animals already vs. having had a quarantine. Quarantine is good practice, but is especially important when an animal is showing signs of being compromised
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2015
  3. H Diamond

    H Diamond Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Get a fecal done on her. You need to know if you're dealing with worms, cocci, or something else.
     
  4. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Because of where I am, and the sad fact that I don't drive, getting her to a vet that handles large animals is a very tall order :(

    I am getting setup to do fecal testing here ASAP. Unless it would be faster/better to send a sample somewhere?

    I got a temp on her and it's 101.1 so no fever.... she also has not had any diarrhea, doesn't cocci cause scours?

    Thank you SO MUCH for the advice. I know I rushed into getting goats, and now realizing my mistakes, but I'm committed to working this out and making sure everybody is okay. If I could drive- I would take her... but that's not my choice :(
     
  5. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Does copper deficiency also cause pale eyelids?
     
  6. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Farm call - most large animal vet practices do farm calls, where they come to you. Yes, there is often an additional fee, but the health of your animal is worth it.
     
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  7. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Nope. Copper deficiency signs usually manifest in disorders of the integumentary system (skin and hair) and nervous system. If a goat is that severely copper deficient that is causes anemia, you'd likely see other symptoms first, such as ataxia, hair loss, weakness, etc. It does have a role in erythrogenesis, but the other stuff is obviously affected first. Not trying to say they are not copper deficient, because they definitely are from your description (pretty classic presentation, rough coat, fish tail, etc.)

    You can bring fecal sample to the vet. That is how they work. Collect fresh berries from each goat.

    This is a serious enough situation that you need to involve a veterinarian. You got the goats cheaply, well, now this is the consequence, expensive vet care. Think about it. If you were wasting away and anemic, you'd go to the doctor, wouldn't you? Well, a goat can't hop in the car and drive to the nearest walk in clinic. You bear that responsibility now. Trust me, I know it is expensive. I don't have a huge income, but when my goats need the vet, they get the vet. Though I can often consult with her on the phone instead.

    Make sure you are giving the ivermectin properly. Did you weigh the goats beforehand so they got the correct dose? Undosing is just as bad as overdosing (though ivermectin has a wide margin of safey, so you can overdose a bit with no consequence). You need to give a second dose ten days after the first. Then a third dose ten days after the second. And a final dose thirty days after the third. This is to ensure you kill all internal parasites. Internal parasites aren't susceptible to wormer at certain phases of their lifecycle, so it ensures you kill all. AND you need to have a fecal sample get cleared by the vet once the course of antiparasitics is complete, to make sure if actually did the trick. Resistance is becoming a problem with the common drugs like ivermectin, so it might not actually do anything.

    Also, it is highly recommended have a sample sent out to check for Johne's disease. WADDL can handle that. You can do a fecal sample or a blood draw. Obviously fecal is easier. Johne's disease will cause goats to waste away. It lives in the soil for years and there is no cure. So if they're positive for it, they need to be destroyed, and you won't be able to keep goats or any other ruminant on that property for quite a white. Goats rarely get diarrhea if they have Johne's, by the way. So goats not having that is not a clear bill of health.
     
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  8. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the info. I've called 3 different vets in my state this morning, gave info, and am waiting on a call back to consult.
    We did weigh them before dosing and gave it orally and rounded doses up. (I read up on it beforehand) and I have the 10 day intervals marked on my calender.
    THANK YOU for clarification about a 4th dose 30 days after the 3rd dose. Is that right? I will mark that down too!
    Tomorrow is the 2nd dose.
    I got regular Ivomec, not Ivomec Plus.

    I am planning to learn to read fecal floats here myself. Until then, I hope I can get a sample to a vet.
     
  9. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I got a call back from a vet who works with goats. He is in my state, but not my area. However he gave me a lot of advice on the phone. (I'm saving that #!)
    He said I'm on the right track, and that I can give her kale along with Red Cell to help her iron levels to help the anemia.
    He also said that just keeping her on proper feeding will help. That if someone couldn't afford to feed them, they probably also were not worming them or giving them all they need.
    He also said that the copper in the feed and minerals will be enough to get her okay over time. Which I am not sure- what do you guys think? I have been reading a lot of good things about giving a copper bolus to help with general health and also barber pole worms.
    Lastly he gave me tips on fecal floats and told me if I have any troubles reading them, I can send images to his office.

    Still waiting to hear from other vets. If someone is closer to me, maybe i can send a fecal to them, or they can come here.

    Right now I am feeling lots better having had a vet reassure me. The goat is up and around, eating and has a very good appetite and is not lethargic at all.
    He said it is hard for them to rebuild red blood cells. That it takes time.

    I know I need to find out the worm or other underlying issue, and make sure the wormer I'm using is working. He did not say anything about Johne's disease, but I am going to see what other vets say too.
     
  10. H Diamond

    H Diamond Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You don't have to wait for a vet for a fecal sample. You can take one and mail it off to a testing lab.
    Yes it takes a long time for them to come back from bad anemia.
    Most minerals do not supply enough copper. I would bolus her as soon as you get them in, the tray according to symptoms until you very an idea of how often she might need bolused. Each goat is different as to how often they need bolused.
     
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