Vet says gapeworm, recommends unavailable treatment; options?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by timebider, Dec 6, 2016.

  1. timebider

    timebider Out Of The Brooder

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    I took my sick girl to the vet today with symptoms of standing around inactive, drooping tail, and open-mouth breathing. She could find nothing wrong on exam or on throat swab for bacteria and parasites. She thinks it's probably gapeworm because there are wild pheasants running around on our place, and told me to dose her for five days with Safe-Guard Aquasol at 200 mg/mL strength, which is apparently the only FDA-approved treatment. But, she doesn't have Aquasol and neither do the farm stores around here. I really want to do something to help this chicken fast; any ideas what else I can try? The farm store had the same medication but it was a much higher-dosage paste for cattle. Thanks!
     
  2. penny1960

    penny1960 la la land awaits Premium Member

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    I have not looked at the farms store but you would have to cut the
    dosage requested by the vet.. there are several on the market for dog,
    horse and cattle see what you could pickup then we can probably
    help
     
  3. timebider

    timebider Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks, Penny. The vet called me to come pick up some Panacur instead. I gave it to her as prescribed but it's a tiny dose and some went on her feathers, and I'm afraid I hurt her even though I was being as gentle as I could. I held her wattles to open her beak and afterward there was a bit of smeared blood on my fingers. This could be because two of the others picked on her a bit after she came back from the vet, but I don't know. When I went out to give her the medicine, she was breathing heavily with her beak closed (not panting) on her roost. I'm honestly pretty worried because the vet says if it's not gapeworm she doesn't know what's wrong, but the symptoms just don't completely add up according to what I've read. I should probably just not have pets; I can't take it when anything happens to them. :/
     
  4. penny1960

    penny1960 la la land awaits Premium Member

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    vet was panacur is the same thing different name sure the blood isn't from you small nick
    I hope not birdy maybe you could isolate her in in a box or dog crate do not think you did wrong please
    she would be in a world of hurt if you had not stepped in right..
    but I would isolate her for the night if you can
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    @timebider
    Email these pictures to your vet:
    From Veterinary Parasitology Handbook - Gapeworm
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    -Kathy
     
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  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    also send this:
    Efficacy of fenbendazole against helminth parasites of poultry in Uganda.

    Ssenyonga GS.
    Abstract

    Fenbendazole 4% (Panacur, Hoechst) administered in feed was used to treat chickens infected with Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Railletina spp. It was also used to treat Syngamus trachea in broiler birds. There was a marked drop in helminth egg counts in the faeces on the second day of treatment and the faeces became negative by the seventh day after the last treatment. Post-mortem examination 15 to 21 days later showed that the drug was 100% effective against Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum at 10 mg/kg. However, for complete removal of Railletina spp. 15 mg/kg was required. Similarly 20 mg/kg fenbendazole was effective against Syngamus trachea. It was concluded that fenbendazole is suitable for the treatment of the important intestinal and tracheal worms of poultry, a dose of 15 to 20 mg/kg for 3 consecutive days being recommended for use under field conditions.
     
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  7. penny1960

    penny1960 la la land awaits Premium Member

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    @timebider I asked are member to step in to help with dosage as I wanted to
    be correct alright I want to help you as you care deeply about your birds
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Safeguard Aquasol = fenbendazole 200 mg/ml (20%)
    Safeguard liquid for cattle = fenbendazole 100 mg/ml (10%)
    Safeguard liquid for goats = fenbendazole 100 mg/ml (10%)
    Safeguard paste for horses = fenbendazole 100 mg/ml (10%)
    Safeguard paste for cattle = fenbendazole 100 mg/ml (10%)
    Panacur liquid for cattle = fenbendazole 100 mg/ml (10%)
    Panacur liquid for dogs and cats = fenbendazole 100 mg/ml (10%)
    Panacur paste for horses = fenbendazole 100 mg/ml (10%)

    -Kathy
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    http://www.hopkinslivestock.com/oral_dosing_article.htm



    How to give Oral Medications


    Oral Dosing by @new 2 pfowl

    • How do I know if I should be administering medication orally?

    This depends upon various factors, such as what the medication is and how ill your bird is. In general, keep in mind that oral dosing is often the best way to control dosage and to ensure that your bird actually receives this dosage.

    • What tools do I need to dose orally? Where do I get them?

    You will need a small oral medication (needleless) syringe, suggested size 1 ml/cc, depending upon the dose being administered. They can be easily obtained online (for example, search for “oral medication syringe” on Amazon).
    [​IMG]

    Please see details elsewhere in this thread about where to obtain medication.

    • How do I determine the dosage?

    Please see helpful dosing information elsewhere in this thread.

    • How do I do it, anyways?

    You will need a helper to ensure the safety and proper medication of your bird.

    1. Have your medication measures and the syringe prepared before taking any action.
    2. Catch and restrain the bird.
    3. Have your helper gently pry the bird’s beak open.

    [​IMG]

    4. Be sure that you understand where the medication-filled syringe should be inserted.
    The opening in the center at the back of the tongue is the trachea – nothing should ever go in there!

    [​IMG]


    5. Gently insert the syringe alongside the tongue, and inject the medication slowly to ensure that it does not spill over into the trachea.

    [​IMG]

    Pictures above are from:

    http://www.hopkinslivestock.com/oral_dosing_article.htm
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2016
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    @timebider , how much does your chicken weigh and how much did Panacur did the vet tell you to give?

    -Kathy
     

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