Vinegar, salt, H2O2 in chill water???

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Mac_, May 19, 2010.

  1. Mac_

    Mac_ Out Of The Brooder

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    Vinegar, salt, H2O2 in chill water???

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    I am starting to process our broilers and ducks on farm this year, in part to avoid the chlorine used at the processing plant.

    I have read that H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) can be used for a carcass rinse. I've also read that cleaning a surface with white vinegar and then H2O2 will have results superior to using bleach.

    Anybody use either

    as a carcass rinse after gutting?

    in the chill water?

    I have read that using too much H2O2 can make the skin appear kind of pasty white. There is food grade hyd. per.. Peaceful Valley sells it. Organic growers inject it into their drip irrigation systems to increase plant vigor. I remember reading that there is hyd. per. in rain during a thunderstorm.

    Feedback would be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Mac
     
  2. scubaforlife

    scubaforlife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My processor uses only water.

    They clean with soap and water after the birds are gone.
     
  3. dancingbear

    dancingbear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    IMHO, you don't really need to worry about it at all. As long as you are careful while processing your birds, they don't need to be disinfected. Plus, I assume you'll be cooking them, so any bacteria (and there will be bacteria, but it's not usually anything to be worried about as far as keeping qualities go, with proper refrigeration/freezing) will be killed when they're cooked.

    I don't use bleach or anything on mine, but I don't have a few thousand overworked employees, who may or may not be careful, cleaning millions of birds....

    Whether the H2O2 is food grade or not, is not going to make any difference on turning the skin pasty white. It's the bubbling/cell-exploding action that takes place when it comes in contact with proteins that causes that. If you feel you must use something, you might try just a strong vinegar/ and water solution, let them soak 10 minutes or so, then rinse to remove the vinegar, unless you want pickled chickens.
     
  4. slc

    slc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Colloidal Silver!

    Non antibiotic, non toxic, non corrosive, absolutely non reactive, tasteless, safe as water unless you are a bacteria, fungi, or virus. Scientifically proven to kill nearly 700 types of bacteria, fungi, viruses even AIDs, H1N1, and antibiotic resistant "super bugs". It has been around for more than a 1000 years but fell out of common knowledge at the discovery of antibiotics and drug companies. I can't vouch for most of the information you'll find by googling it, however, I use it daily to disinfect, put it in chickens water, wash eggs with it, it heals wounds like magic! We take it orally during cold and flu season (haven't been sick in 4 years). Fruits and veggies and milk lasts ALOT longer with it in the fridge etc. etc.

    Colloidal silver is simply microscopic silver particles that suspend in distilled water much the same way our blood cells suspend in the liquid blood components (ie colloidal). You make it by connecting 9 volt batteries to pure .999 silver wire and suspend the wire in distilled water. The small electrical current pulls super small micro particles (smaller than a virus) off the silver wire and because they have a positive charge they "hover" inside the water. They work by mechanically preventing tiny one celled life forms from using oxygen and so they suffocate. It does not have any effect on living tissues such as the body, only individual one cell life forms like bacteria and viruses. Nothing is capable of developing a resistance (unlike antibiotics) because the effect is more of a mechanical effect on a function necessary for life. The silver particles remain after liquid evaporates and continue to work on surfaces (anti-microbial). You can add it to paint for an anti-fungal.

    I make it a gallon at a time for the cost of distilled water. I use a kit from the link below to make it. A little goes a long way when mixed in plain water for cleaning.

    I don't see why this can't be used as an anti-microbial in the chill water. And since the particles would continue to work after bagging, it seems logical that it would help control bacteria at the food preparation stage once the bird is thawed too. This is something I am going to use myself when we process our first batch of broilers this year.

    Here's what I use to make it: http://www.atlasnova.com/ColloidalSilverStarterKit.htm

    some
    info.
    http://colloidalsilver.freeservers.com/whatiscs.html
    http://colloidalsilversecrets.blogspot.com/2008/02/does-colloidal-silver-really-cure.html
     
  5. kiwi-chookn

    kiwi-chookn Out Of The Brooder

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    CS is a brilliant thing.
    It can be made by yourself with a few 9v batteries and some pure silver rods or wire.The smaller the voltage,the smaller the particles/higher the PPM ratio.
    I make a bit from time to time,its beneficial/usefull for a multitude of things.
     
  6. dancingbear

    dancingbear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use CS now and then, I made my CS generator from a 9V battery, 2 pieces of insulated wire, 2 alligator clips, 2 wooden popsicle sticks, electrical tape, and a snap-on battery terminal like you find in 9V devices. It cost me maybe $3, then I bought some 14-G .999 pure silver wire to use with it. That costs a bit, but I forget how much. Certainly a lot less than that kit. It works fine with 1 battery, and you really don't need a meter to use it. We already had a meter anyway, if I'd needed it.
     
  7. slc

    slc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, you don't need any "kit" or meter. I only use the meter so I can see readings showing when the ppm reaches saturation just before it begins to build bigger particles, turning the solution a yellow tinge. I can get the smallest silver particles at the highest ppm that way. For adding to paint, etc, I let the solution build a little bigger particle though. For the chill water I will be going with the smaller particle solution so it is more effective for biological control and will get into the surface tissue better. I brew big batches in large 1 gallon pickle jars I got from a local restaurant. For those new to CS, you have to store it in glass out of the light. It is charged and glass keeps the solution in suspension longer.
     
  8. slc

    slc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've just found legitimate proof that CS works as a "processing aid". Evidently they have already been playing with the silver particle in food processing. They call it silver dihydrogen citrate (SDC) and patented it as Axen50 (50ppm silver). BTW dihydrogen is just another chemical name for water. "electronically generated ionic silver" certainly is colloidal silver. Another site explains that they use citric acid in generating colloidal silver to stabilize it. This silver citrate solution becomes too strong for consumption directly but it would be great for sanitizing or diluting for chill tanks.

    So "silver dihydrogen citrate" is another name for colloidal silver made with water that has citric acid added to it. LOL funny how they can make things sound technical so people believe this is something new and complicated.

    http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/...approves-sanitiser-for-food-processing-plants
     
  9. dancingbear

    dancingbear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use it for eye infections and tp prevent infection in wounds, and I've used it in the past to treat various ailments, colds, etc. I'd actually sort of forgotten about it, so I'm glad the topic came up.

    I won't be using it in processing chickens, though, because I don't think I need to. The way I've been processing for years has worked just fine, I don't expect that'll change.
     

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