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Wait, wait, hold on...(Egg-turning Question)

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Draconargentum, Sep 18, 2007.

  1. Draconargentum

    Draconargentum Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm still a newbie here, learning what to do before I subject any babies to my inexperience, but now I'm confused: I've always read that you need to turn eggs three times a day up until the three days before hatching. Am I just seeing things when I believe that I read somewhere that you can just tilt them instead? It seems like that would be much easier, but...Well. *Shrug*

    Any tips from personal experience, and any suggestions as to incubators (no huge ones, though, please, I'm just planning on a small flock) would be greatly appreciated. ^_^
     
  2. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I just roll them over 180 but you could also tip them 90 deg left and right around the air cell (45 deg each way)
     
  3. Pine Grove

    Pine Grove Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Complete rotation is not necessary, Just jilting 3 times a day is sufficient to keep the embryo from sticking
     
  4. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Auto turning systems only tilt them and your average, clumsy hen only knocks them about as she stumbles around the nest.

    Slavish devotion to marking schemes and precise turning is not needed. I think it was developed mostly so people had something to do. Otherwise incubation is pretty dull stuff - 3 weeks of watching eggs that do most of nothing!

    What you are doing is preventing the egg innards and forming embryos from sticking to the eggshell membranes. By the time 2 weeks have passed its more habit than neccessary.

    All I do is put on a clean cotton glove, reach my hand in one of the viewing windows and roll them around gently with my palm. I dont touch them with my hands, even after washing them.

    But that's it for turning. 2-3 three times a day is more than adequate.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 19, 2007
  5. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Quote:Like watching paint dry, you at least gotta twiddle your thumbs!
     
  6. Draconargentum

    Draconargentum Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh, okay. That makes sense now. ^_^ Thanks for explaining it all.

    So, does anyone have any other tips on hatching eggs that can't be found in the appropriate section of this site?
     
  7. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    TONS! I've been doing it for a long time now and was taught by people who didnt know about 'web sites' and 'rules' and so on. The hand rolling is just one example. Is there something specific you want to ask about?
     
  8. Draconargentum

    Draconargentum Out Of The Brooder

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    Well, lessee...I hope you'll pardon my listing:

    Do you have any suggestions of relatively small 'bators that give good hatch rates? I don't need a big one: in fact, I doubt I'll ever be hatching more than, eh, a dozen eggs at a time. Also, what are the pros and cons of plastic vs. foam vs whatever? Is it "better" to just go with a bought 'bator rather than a homemade one, such as those the links lead to from the "how-to" pages?

    What is the purpose of the water wigglers I've been seeing in some people's incubators?

    Do you prefer regular incubation or the "dry incubation" discussed in the how-to pages? Which one, in your opinion is easier and/or gives better hatch rates?

    Any tips on insulating incubators from outside chills? I live in Phoenix, Arizona, so in the summer my AC is on pretty much all the time and the humidity is negligible at best (with the exception of the yearly monsoon).

    For candling...Will a regular flashlight work okay, or would it be better to have an actual candling box?

    Whew...That should be enough for the moment. Sorry. ^_^;
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2007
  9. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    It's fine, glad to help.

    Do you have any suggestions of relatively small 'bators that give good hatch rates? I don't need a big one: in fact, I doubt I'll ever be hatching more than, eh, a dozen eggs at a time.
    Also, what are the pros and cons of plastic vs. foam vs whatever?

    Currently there are few small bators that you would call entry level BUT the foamies. The two most often seen are the Little Giant and the Hovabator. Neither is worth a spittin bit of difference over the other. Neither are worth spittin ON without the circulating air fan installed. You can buy the bator with the fan, or get it as a retro fit item for baotrs that lack one. When you get your bator, throw out the crappy little bulb thermometer that comes with it, if it is still there...chances are it wont be, having failed long ago Then get an aquarium/herpetarium thermo w/ remote probe for under $10 and a cigar humidor hygrometer for 10-15$, both off ebay. Now you are working with some decent tools.

    Finally, get a water weasel at WalMart for under a $1 and you are set. To learn what that is, google "water weasel."

    The next models to consider are the Marsh/Lyon TX models. These are the Cadillacs of benchtop bators and I strongly urge you save your money up till you can get one. They are complete, self-regulating in both temp AND humidity and really are 'luxe max' over the foamies.
    Whichever bator you do get, try to buy a working used model. You dont need to sink alot of money here.

    Is it "better" to just go with a bought 'bator rather than a homemade one, such as those the links lead to from the "how-to" pages?

    Personally, I say yes, at least until you get a few hatches under your belt. The money you save building your own, when you dont know what you're doing in the first place, is false economy.

    Do you prefer regular incubation or the "dry incubation" discussed in the how-to pages? Which one, in your opinion is easier and/or gives better hatch rates?

    I use a hybrid method. I add NO moisture until I have an established chamber up and running under load. I monitor and adjust well in advance of making ANY Rh adjustments. What is important with humidity is:
    1. That you UNDERSTAND what "dry incubation" means and what it implies. It is not an absolute thing, but amindset.
    2. That you understand what relative humidity means and what things affect humidity, especially isobaric pressures.
    2. That you know what YOUR humidity is, both in your hatching room, chamber and the environment.
    4. That you know how atmospheric changes manifest themselves in your incubator.

    Do THESE and you should have little trouble. With modern controllers and heaters, temperatures are the easy part. Humidity is the least understood factor in artificial incubation, in my experience.

    Any tips on insulating incubators from outside chills? I live in Phoenix, Arizona, so in the summer my AC is on pretty much all the time and the humidity is negligible at best (with the exception of the yearly monsoon).

    Keep your bator on the floor in an empty or little used closet to prevent drafts. Place it on a piece of 1" builders foam board to insulate it from the floor. Make a "jacket" from bubble wrap and duct tape, ensuring you leave the vents clear. Expect to adjust Rh in your situation, shooting for a range of between 35- 55%

    For candling...Will a regular flashlight work okay, or would it be better to have an actual candling box?

    In my experience, flashlights are troublesome. Juggling the light and eggs and so on is a pain. And I feel they are weak in candlepower. Here's what I say you should do. Make a candling box from a thrift-store lamp socket/with corded plug, a 150W flourescent bulb (cooler than incandescents), large candy tin, oatmeal box or what have you. Total cost should not be more than $10. Make a 1 1/4" hole in the top and place a rubber or felt grommet around it to cushion the egg. Then you set the egg on it and examine it to your hearts content, without all the juggling.​
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 19, 2007
  10. Draconargentum

    Draconargentum Out Of The Brooder

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    May 9, 2007
    Cool thanks...Here's round 2!

    What is the purpose of the water wigglers I keep seeing in some people's incubators?

    And, following your advice on saving up for a bator of the Lyon brand, I went on their website and found this. What is your opinion, if any, of this incubator?
    http://lyonelectric.com/R-ComMini.html
     

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