Walk me through de-spurring?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Tanichca, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. Tanichca

    Tanichca Sparkle Magnet

    9,249
    73
    308
    May 6, 2009
    Vail, Arizona
    OK, I know there is a method that uses a potato (we don't have a potato) and then there's one where you soak the birds feet... but I really have never done this before, and Thor is tripping on his spurs, so it's time for those sabers to go! What does one use for the actual de-spurring? And how does one take them off? Thanks!
     
  2. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps


    Very simple, using a plier, grasp the spur about 1/2 inch from the leg. Give it a sharp, quick twist and the outer sheath will seperate from the inner spur, which is similar to the quick of a nail. The sheath will then slide right off and leave the root, which is shaped the same, but smaller. In a few days the root will harden and become the new spur, but smaller than the original.
    The spur can also be sawed off with a hacksaw, but the easiest way to saw off a spur is with a Dremmel Tool and cut off wheel. Have someone hold the cock and cut the spur 3/8 or 1/2 inch from the leg. Usually it doesn't bleed, but a little baking flour from your kitchen and spme pressure for a few seconds will stop bleeding, if needed............Pop
     
  3. duckinnut

    duckinnut Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,933
    78
    173
    Jul 18, 2010
    Marshfield, Ma.
    I use the latter that POP said. I use a hack saw to cut them off about a 1/2 inch from his leg. Luckily I am strong enough to grab him by his feet and cross his legs to achieve this method. The roo is a White Rock and probably pushing 10 pounds. Anyway after the spur is cut off I use bar soap on the end of the spur and it stops bleeding instantly. Just rub the bar on the cut area. To do both spurs takes 5 minutes.
     
  4. Tanichca

    Tanichca Sparkle Magnet

    9,249
    73
    308
    May 6, 2009
    Vail, Arizona
    Thanks for the advice... I did it! There was some minimal bleeding (used pliers on one leg and the hacksaw method on the other, just to see which one I liked best) but he is fine now. [​IMG]
     
  5. Den in Penn

    Den in Penn Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,418
    196
    216
    Dec 15, 2011
    SE Pa.
    So which did you like best?
     
  6. Tanichca

    Tanichca Sparkle Magnet

    9,249
    73
    308
    May 6, 2009
    Vail, Arizona
    I liked the sawing off way better, it was easier on my tendinitis- ridden wrists than twisting.
     
  7. duckinnut

    duckinnut Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,933
    78
    173
    Jul 18, 2010
    Marshfield, Ma.
    Did you try the bar of soap trick? Way easier than the flour, learned that trick from a friend of my from Ireland who now resides in the US. You know back in the old country story but works terrific.
     
  8. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    May try that one myself. Never to old to learn. Thanks........Pop
     
  9. chickenmomma2

    chickenmomma2 Chillin' With My Peeps

    71
    8
    86
    May 27, 2012
    OK. I despured one roo and I have 3 more to do. How do you get the bar of soap on them? That is a new one on me. I tried the flour method and was not impressed. Wouldn't stop bleeding. So I had to put a pressure bandage on him until the next morning.
     
  10. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hmmm, still haven't tried the soap, but if I was gonna do it, I would rub the soap all over the end of the stub, maybe even jamb the stub into the bar. I've had cocks that bled, but seldom anything bad. One thing I do when dubbing is give the stag a vitamin K tablet about a half hour before. That thickens the blood and slows down the bleeding. Might help when trimming spurs.......Pop
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by