Want to hatch out some eggs in my new homemade bator.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by theblackridge16, Dec 14, 2010.

  1. theblackridge16

    theblackridge16 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 9, 2010
    Pintura, Utah
    I just need some info on bator hummidity levels, like where they need to be and for how long they need to be at those levels? I read they need to be at 55% but is that for the whole 21 day period?

    Also my computer fan went out while I was testing the bator to make sure everything ran good, I was wondering if i could run it as a still air bator or will that not work?
     
  2. SED

    SED Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Humidity levels should be around 50% for the first 28 days and then raised to about 65-70% for the last three days. Also, if you run it as a still air incubator, remember to raise your temps. Forced Air- 99.5 degrees and Still Air- 101.5 degrees. Hope this helps.
     
  3. theblackridge16

    theblackridge16 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 9, 2010
    Pintura, Utah
    It helps alot, thank you very much!
     
  4. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Adair Co., KY
    Humidity is really more of an experience thing. I've read it should be 45% for the first 18 days then up to at least 55% for days 18-21. I don't do this, 45% is too high in my incubator. I get a lot of chicks that can't zip because they are too big in the shell.

    I usually run mine around 25%-35% days 1-18, then up to 50% or higher until hatch. This is called 'dry' hatching and a lot of people use this. I hatch everything like this except for geese, but I'll probably do geese like this next year since I didn't have much luck with geese this past year. I've had chicks and ducklings hatch at 25% when I've forgotten to move them to the 'hatcher' and they didn't have any troubles.

    So my vote is for 35-ish% during incubation then at least 50% for hatching [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2010
  5. FlashPointFarm

    FlashPointFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I used to keep my humidity higher too, like the first post. I had a lot of troubles. Lots of yolks not being absorbed and sticky chicks not being able to get out. You're going to have to allow a trial and error period. I think the humidity levels at your location make a huge difference. I don't think there is a right or wrong answer here.
     
  6. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Adair Co., KY
    Quote:Well, you wouldn't want to keep the humidity in the 60's or higher the whole time, but otherwise the 'no wrong answers' thing works [​IMG]
     
  7. theblackridge16

    theblackridge16 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 9, 2010
    Pintura, Utah
    Thank yall very much I appriciate all the advice! I guess I'll just have to try it out and see what works best for me? Thanks again!
     

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